Weight can affect a person's self-esteem. Excess weight is highly visible and evokes some powerful reactions, however unfairly, from other people and from the people who carry the excess weight. The amount of weight loss needed to improve your health may be much less than you wish to lose, when you consider how you evaluate your weight. Research has shown that your health can be greatly improved by a loss of 5–10 percent of your starting weight. That doesn't mean you have to stop there, but it does mean that an initial goal of losing 5–10 percent of your starting weight is both realistic and valuable.
Want to burn more fat? Sleep more because the impact of sleep on weight loss is significant. The importance of sound sleep is the #1 non-negotiable – it is the time your body requires to heal, rest and power up for the next day. By not getting enough sleep, you are putting stress on your body and increase the hormones that make you even more tired – which leads your body to STORE fat instead of burn fat! Besides feeling excessively tired, lack of sound sleep also spurs bad carb cravings and caffeine which can become a vicious cycle that millions of people are currently stuck in. Tips: Stop all technology at least 30 minutes before bed, invest in a great bed/pillow, use blackout curtains and try doing something calm and restful before bed like reading. Sip on some sleepy time or chamomile tea 60 minutes before bed for the calming effects of the herbs.
If you want to shrink your gut, get enough protein in your diet. In this case, about 25 percent of calories. Why? For starters, protein makes you feel full and helps you build muscle (which increases metabolism, thereby making it easier to lose weight). Just as important, high-protein diets have been shown to be the best way of attacking belly fat. In one study, published in the International Journal of Obesity, Danish researchers put 65 people on either a 12 percent protein diet or a 25 percent protein diet. The low-protein dieters lost an average of 11 pounds, which isn't bad. But the high-protein subjects lost an average of 20 pounds--including twice as much abdominal fat as the low-protein group.

I have struggled with my weight and binge eating my entire life. Finally, at 49 years old, I have found a lifestyle - the FASTer Way to Fat Loss lifestyle - that works with me and my busy life. I am a busy full time professional and I travel quite a bit. Never knowing where I am, I am able to do the workouts and eat following the guidelines of the plan from anywhere. I knew I had experienced a major mind set shift over the weekend when I came across an old bottle of prescription diet pills I had been hanging onto as a crutch. I no longer need those and never would consider taking those now that I have taken control of my body and changed my mindset. Eating real whole food and moving my body consistently has led to this transformation from a size 10-12 to a size 6. I'm wearing clothes I haven't worn in years. Most importantly, I don't have a deadline to get weight off or see a certain number on the scale as I used to. I am trusting that my body will continue in its transformation until I lose this excess body fat. I am halfway there, and I know I'll be successful. I no longer have the mindset that I have to be perfect in my eating. I used to fall off the wagon and literally binge for three days and then feel horrible. Progress, not perfection. Thank you for that mantra, Amanda, and for creating this wonderful program. I am so thankful that I discovered this program and can continue to enjoy it with VIP membership now that I've completed two 6 week cycles.
The prevailing formula for a long time on how much fat you’re going to burn was calories in minus calories out, based on your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and exercise efforts, explains strength and performance specialist Joel Seedman, Ph.D., owner of Advanced Human Performance in Atlanta. But with all the different biochemical reactions in the body, hormonal response, and endocrine function, there are an infinite number of factors that can affect how your body is storing and breaking down calories.
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