Unfortunately, some women are just more prone to carrying weight in their middle instead of their hips and thighs. Sometimes, it’s genetics—maybe your mother was more apple-shaped. Belly fat can also increase around menopause, or for women who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Even certain lifestyle habits, from lack of sleep to stress, can make your belly grow. To lose belly fat, talking with a doctor about what other factors may be affecting your weight gain can be a good place to start. From there, you can craft a belly fat busting routine.

SOURCES: WebMD Feature: "With Fruits and Veggies, More Matters." 2005 U.S. Dietary Guidelines. Elizabeth Ward, MS, RD, author, The Pocket Idiot's Guide to the New Food Pyramids. Elaine Magee, MPH, RD,author, Comfort Food Makeovers. Brian Wansink, PhD, professor and director, Cornell Food and Brand Lab, Ithaca, N.Y.; author, Mindless Eating. Barbara Rolls, PhD, professor of nutritional sciences; and director, laboratory for the study of human ingestive behaviors, Penn State University; and author, The Volumetrics Eating Plan.


Physical activity helps burn abdominal fat. “One of the biggest benefits of exercise is that you get a lot of bang for your buck on body composition,” Stewart says. Exercise seems to work off belly fat in particular because it reduces circulating levels of insulin—which would otherwise signal the body to hang on to fat—and causes the liver to use up fatty acids, especially those nearby visceral fat deposits, he says.
If you're dehydrated, it can be hard to tell if you're hungry or just thirsty. If you're craving a mid-day snack, have a glass of water and wait a few minutes before reassessing how hungry you really are. Water also helps food move through your digestive system, lessening feelings of bloating. It's a good idea to keep a water bottle with you throughout the day. Add in cucumber slices or fresh fruit to infuse flavor.
3. Stand up more: By now, we all know sitting for too long increases your risk for most diseases, including obesity. But it also shuts down your body’s ability to metabolize fat. According to a study from Missouri University, certain enzymes in the blood vessels of muscles that are responsible for burning fat are “shut off” if you sit still for too long. The good news? The researchers say standing and moving just lightly will re-engage the enzymes.

Where do I begin... this is the first time I have completed a program thinking I WANT to do this again. Because it actually worked. Through life, and emergencies, and vacations... it still worked. Unlike so many programs that make you use silly containers and a complicated meal plan with expensive shakes and promises of change in 21 days (that actually left me feeling depleted and hangry) I felt a difference in this program the first week with just an adjustment and understand of IF. Coupled with carb cycling and specific workout routines, I found that I was not looking forward to the END of this program like so many that I've tried. I have no intention of stopping IF. My digestive system is finally working! TMI? Sorry ;) I have celiac and hypothyroidism (so low I've been tested for hoshimotos) but my energy levels are relatively high, leading to more even temperament and better sleep. I'm tempted to get my thyroid levels tested again just to see how drastically things have improved! I love so much about what this program has done for my body internally, I forget to notice what it's done externally. Which is over 7" and 8 lbs lost, down a pant size, and strength and stamina I didn't have before! What has made me a probable lifer of the faster way and forever fan of Amanda's, is that this works with life. We have had birthdays, holidays, vacations and unforeseen medical issues arise and I didnt worry about not being on track. Normally things like this, especially emergencies and medical problems would rock me off my workout program, but I never felt like that with the Faster Way. My toddler had a huge accident on a bike which did occupy a lot of my time for a couple weeks while he healed, and I wasn't able to get a few workouts in for a couple weeks, but it didn't make me quit the program. I kept up with the diet recommendations and when my life allowed, I jumped back into the physical activity. Considering I wasn't able to commit 110% with what life threw at me the last few weeks, I'm still SO happy with my results and I know it's because of our new eating lifestyle. This is the first time I've ever been able to get my husband on board to do a workout program with me. While he seemed to be a little dramatic about food tracking, since he could see what his normal grabs would contain, he rocks at making great meal plans for us now. He is the first one now to rant and rave about our fasting lifestyle because he feels GREAT and while we are healthy eaters (organic and whole foods 99% of the time), he doesn't feel limited or restricted if an occasion arises where he wants to indulge. And he was the first one to say "We need to do this again". If we were to do this program during a slower season of life, I know our physical results would be amazing. But considering our life has been chaos (cross country move, starting a new business, homeschooling, traveling, dental emergencies, sickness, sleep deprivation etc,) and we still had great success, I'm happy to do this during any season of life. Thank you so much for the education and support around intermittent fasting and the benefits of getting our bodies on a schedule. While the program itself has ended, we are still going. Much love xo
High-intensity interval training—HIIT—has gained a reputation as an efficient way to get fast results. This workout involves short (30 seconds to five minutes), vigorous bursts of activity interspersed with periods of rest for maximum results. Incorporating HIIT into your strength training may offer even more results, according to a recent study by the American Council on Exercise—the results suggest the combo may be even more effective in burning fat fast.
MISS cardio shoud be performed at a moderate pace for a moderate duration. The type of cardio performed doesn’t matter. The only thing that matters is that you pick one moderate intensity and keep that pace throughout the entire cardio session. If you are unable to keep that pace throughout the entire session then the pace was too intense and needs to be lowered the next time. 65%-70% of max intensity is best for creating the optimal calorie burn without reaching the point where the work has become too intense and begins to be more anaerobic than aerobic.
When Johns Hopkins researchers compared the effects on the heart of losing weight through a low-carbohydrate diet versus a low-fat diet for six months—each containing the same amount of calories—those on a low-carb diet lost an average of 10 pounds more than those on a low-fat diet—28.9 pounds versus 18.7 pounds. An extra benefit of the low-carb diet is that it produced a higher quality of weight loss, Stewart says. With weight loss, fat is reduced, but there is also often a loss of lean tissue (muscle), which is not desirable. On both diets, there was a loss of about 2 to 3 pounds of good lean tissue along with the fat, which means that the fat loss percentage was much higher on the low-carb diet.

A different way of viewing weight loss identifies the problem as not one of consuming too many calories, but rather the way the body accumulates fat after consuming carbohydrates—in particular the role of the hormone insulin. When you eat a meal, carbohydrates from the food enter your bloodstream as glucose. In order to keep your blood sugar levels in check, your body always burns off this glucose before it burns off fat from a meal.
I agree with Karina - if I were to calculate my daily calorie requirements based on your figures above (I’m somewhere between an echo and meso) I’d get fat using the lowest figure. Your calculations take no account of age and activity level inside or outside of the gym. I prefer to use a TDEE calculator to calculate my daily calorie needs (there you can add age, activity level, current body fat levels if known etc, for a far more accurate figure), and would suggest anyone looking to lose fat do the same and then come back to this article for information on macros etc.

It’s a little counterintuitive, but consuming calories after you’ve just burned them appears to be vital to fat-burning. Your muscles need a combo of protein and carbs to replenish energy stores and build new muscle. In one study, people who downed a 270-calorie shake with 24 grams of protein and 36 grams of carbs after their workout lost about four more pounds of fat and built more lean muscle than those who didn’t refuel post-exercise. Eating protein after a workout may help with lean muscle gains and could also help to prevent overeating later in the day, says Lesli Bonci, RD, a nutritionist and owner of Active Eating Advice. Find out what fitness instructors eat post-workout.

The most important thing I’ve taken away from completing this program has to be the amazing sense of accomplishment I now feel. I’ve quit countless programs in the past and was left feeling lazy, unmotivated, undetermined and like a quitter. This program showed me that I’m absolutely capable of following a challenging and detailed program when it’s the PERFECT fit. This is more than a program; it’s a lifestyle. And more importantly it’s a lifestyle that I can definitely see myself continuing with now that my 6 weeks have ended. Even aside from my amazing results (Ten pounds gone & 12.5 inches lost!!), I have found so many other victories through this program. I lifted heavier than I ever thought I could, I stuck to daily and weekly gym sessions and I FINISHED STRONG! Amanda has truly created a program that is a game changer and I am so thankful for the changes it’s sparked in me not only physically, but emotionally as well. I am stronger both inside and out because of the FASTer Way to Fat Loss. Thank you, Amanda!
When you hit the gym, the body releases a fat-liberating messenger called epinephrine, which attaches itself to fat cells and allows fat to be burned as fuel. And, you guessed it, carbohydrates come into play here. Refined carbs consumed before training suppress the exercise- and supplement-induced rise in epinephrine compared to eating the same amount of slower-digesting carbs. Refined carbs also boost insulin levels, further hampering fat-burning during the workout. Bottom line, avoid refined carbs altogether before training.
Losing fat means something different to everyone. Some are just trying to lose a few pounds, some want to get a six pack, and some want to get absolutely shredded. The goals may be different but the principles that will achieve these results remain the same. Follow this guide and your future will be filled with smaller belts, better abs, and many more excuses to take your shirt off in public.

1. Thermogenic fat loss supplements: These capsules are typically loaded with ingredients that help build heat in the body and increase your fat burning abilities. In a new study in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, guys who took supps like this saw their resting metabolic rate increase by 7 to 9 percent compared to taking a placebo.
On the face of it, skipping meals seems like a path to losing weight — if you don’t eat as much, you’ll drop fat. But in practise, it doesn’t work out like that. A 2015 study from Ohio State University found that skipping meals messes up your metabolism and your hormones (specifically insulin), which results in an increased likelihood of abdominal weight gain. Researchers recommended eating several small meals throughout the day as opposed to one or two big ones.
Some antidepressant medications can cause weight gain, especially the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) such as Tryptizol, Saroten, and Clomipramine; as well as newer drugs such as Remeron (Mirtazapine). Lithium (for manic-depressive disorder) often causes weight gain. The most common antidepressants known as SSRI’s (for example Citalopram and Sertraline) usually don’t impact weight significantly. More on depression

Health.com is part of the Meredith Health Group. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. See the Terms of Servicethis link opens in a new tab and Privacy Policythis link opens in a new tab (Your California Rightsthis link opens in a new tab)for more information. Ad Choicesthis link opens in a new tab | EU Data Subject Requeststhis link opens in a new tab


• Fasted training: If you train fasted, supplementing with BCAA’s can offset any potential muscle loss. Anecdotally, people tend to perform better when they consume BCAA’s during their workout, especially if training early in the day. But is it absolutely necessary? No. If you do train fasted, aim to consume some protein (20-30g) post workout and you’ll be fine.
According to a small study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, people who slept for 8.5 hours a night for two weeks lost nearly twice as much weight on average than participants who slept 5.5 hours per night, despite the fact that they followed the same diet and workout plan. That's because when you get a good night's sleep, your hunger hormones, like ghrelin and leptin, stay in check. That means you're not going to wake up with a sudden hankering for a bacon, egg, and cheese. (Start working towards your goals with Women's Health's Body Clock Diet.)
1. High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT): This type of exercise is your key to melting belly fat fast.  HIIT is highly effective for all over weight loss, particularly removing stubborn belly fat. If you are not eating right, you have reached menopause or you are not losing weight you should do these exercises. Don’t let the name scare you as it is you who determines the intensity.  It is your perceived exertion that counts.
LoseWeightByEating.com is committed to providing information on natural and alternative health, but is not written by health care professionals. All material provided at LoseWeightByEating.com is for informational purposes only, and is not to be taken as medical advice or recommendation. Any health concern or condition should be addressed by a doctor or other appropriate health care professional. The information and opinions found on this website are written based on the best data available at the time of writing, and are believed to be accurate according to the best discernment of the authors. Those who do not seek council from the appropriate health care authority assume the liability of any injury which may occur. Additionally, the opinions expressed at LoseWeightByEating.com do not represent the views of each and every author or contributor to LoseWeightByEating.com. The publisher of this site is not responsible for any errors or omissions in any content herein.
If you feel like any extra calories you eat go straight to your belly or thighs, you're not imagining things. Those are usually the areas where you store fat because of your genes, hormones, age, lifestyle, and other factors. Your body tends to hoard calories as fat to keep you alive and safe. The challenge is learning how to get rid of that extra fat.
Any combination of drastically reducing calories and adding aerobic exercise will most certainly result in weight loss. The problem with this is that not all of the weight lost will be from fat. Some of it will be water weight, which is temporary, and some will be muscle. If you lose muscle along with fat, you’ll simply be a smaller version of your previous flabby self.
This kind of strength training recruits fast-twitch muscle fibers, which increases fat burning, says Shore. Although you could see a small increase in the scale as you build muscle, keep in mind that muscle is more dense than fat. That means it’s very likely that you're losing fat while gaining muscle, so don’t stress, says Shore. To keep up your progress, aim to increase the amount of resistance you use when your current weight becomes too easy to lift, says Shore. 
Standing with feet hip-width apart, hold the barbell at chest height with palms facing up and your elbows extended out in front of you. Keeping the barbell rested at your chest, squat deep. In one explosive movement, push up into standing, tilting head back slightly to surge the barbell straight overhead so knees and elbows are both locked straight. Lower barbell back down to shoulders and repeat.
×