Do you even lift, bro? If you’re serious about getting rid of that belly fat fast, resistance training might just be the key. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health found that adding weight training to adult male test subjects’ workouts significantly reduced their risk of abdominal obesity over a multi-year study period, although doing the same amount of cardio had no such effect. Research from the University of Maryland even found that just 16 weeks of weight training boosted study participants’ metabolic rates by a whopping 7.7 percent, making it easier to ditch those extra inches around your middle.
1. Don’t starve yourself: Cortisol—that stress hormone that causes your body to store more fat—is elevated from circumstances of high stress, including extreme dieting, Seedman says. “If you start dropping calories excessively, your body goes into starvation mode and it becomes stressed. You’re in caloric deprivation, but that elevated cortisol causes you to gain body fat in your stomach—it’s a vicious cycle,” he adds.
If you ever needed an excuse to eat more avocados, this is it. People tend to steer clear of healthy fats when they're trying to lose weight, but they might just be the solution. Studies show that by simply adding some avocado to your lunch every day, it'll fill you up enough that you won't be mindlessly munching on junk food later. "Slice one in half, sprinkle a little sea salt, and eat the inside with a spoon," says Alexandra Samit, a Be Well Health Coach at Dr. Frank Lipman's Eleven Eleven Wellness Center in NYC.
If you’re logging just a few hours of sleep a night, you may actually find yourself gaining weight. Researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center found that subjects who slept just four hours had a harder time processing carbs. "When you're exhausted, your body lacks the energy to do its normal day-to-day functions, which includes burning calories efficiently," says Talbott.
You must have noticed that some of your friends eat a lot of sugar-based foods, fried foods, or cold drinks. Yet, they manage to have a flat stomach, the reason being they have a very high metabolic rate. If your metabolism is not good, you may have a bloated stomach. Thyroid conditions, diabetes, and other medical conditions can be the reasons for slow metabolism.
When it comes to weight loss, celeb trainer and New York Times bestselling author Harley Pasternak, MSc, has a catchphrase: "Strong in the gym, lean in life." The Fitbit ambassador, nutrition scientist, and personal coach to the likes of Amy Schumer, Kim Kardashian, and Rihanna has told POPSUGAR on numerous occasions that the best way to lose weight is easier than you think: just walk more. Here, Harley makes his compelling case and shares a simple, month-long plan to get you started.
Do this: We can't harp on this advice too much: Eat at least 1g of protein per pound of bodyweight every day. Your major protein sources should be lean meats (chicken, steak, turkey breast, tuna), egg whites (the yolks contain the fat, so discard most of them when you're trying to lose fat), protein powder (whey or casein), and low-fat cottage cheese. As for fat, limit it to 20-30% of your total daily caloric intake.
Protein. Deciding how much protein to eat at each meal is simple. Take the total protein you are supposed to consume during the day and divide it evenly among the essential eating times. Let’s say, for example, you are supposed to be eating 200 grams of protein per day. Since there 5 essential eating times you just need to divide 200 by 5. This means that you will need to take in 40 grams of protein at each meal.

If you’re logging just a few hours of sleep a night, you may actually find yourself gaining weight. Researchers at the University of Chicago Medical Center found that subjects who slept just four hours had a harder time processing carbs. "When you're exhausted, your body lacks the energy to do its normal day-to-day functions, which includes burning calories efficiently," says Talbott.
Eat small meals more often. In simple terms, eating spurs your metabolism — the process by which your body turns food into energy. Eating more often, then, may kick your metabolism into a higher gear more times per day (e.g., if you eat six times a day, you get six “spikes”). But, you must make sure that eating more often does not also mean eating more; it’s essential that you reduce your overall average daily calories.[3]
Cut back on carbs: Remember how insulin has the biggest impact on fat storage? Well, carbs have the biggest impact on insulin. ”Too many carbohydrates leads to a spike in the hormone and then to more fat storage,” Seedman explains. Not only should you cut back on carbs, but your insulin will spike even more from processed ones, so cut any carb that’s not a whole grain or from real produce completely. And don’t worry: Carbs are traditionally thought of as your body’s main source of energy, but your body also has the ability to fuel from fat, so if you’re increasing your fat and protein intake, your body doesn’t need as many carbs to run. You still need some amount of carbohydrates to regulate certain biological processes, like your muscles’ ability to stay hydrated and maintain structural integrity, so don’t cut the macronutrient completely, Seedman warns. For a high-fat, low-carb diet, aim for at least .5 of your bodyweight (so a 200 lb person would eat at least 100 grams of carbs per day), he suggests. For a more balanced calorie-restricted diet, that number jumps to .75 to 1.5 grams per pound of bodyweight.
Eat more fat: The idea that eating fat makes you fat has been dethroned hard in recent years. And in fact, dietary fat can help you burn more off your body—as long as you’re eating the right kinds. Healthy polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fats—like salmon, trout, avocado, sunflower oils, olive oil, and nuts—can decrease appetite, improve heart health, and stabilize glucose levels which can help trim body fat, Montenegro explains.
Most low-carb diets advocate replacing carbs with protein and fat, which could have some negative long-term effects on your health. If you do try a low-carb diet, you can reduce your risks and limit your intake of saturated and trans fats by choosing lean meats, fish and vegetarian sources of protein, low-fat dairy products, and eating plenty of leafy green and non-starchy vegetables.
If you’re actively watching your weight this season, know this: Research from the University of Chicago found that dieters lost 55% less fat when they slept for 5½ hours than when they slept for 8½ hours. To settle into slumber more easily, avoid lit screens, food and, yes, booze for a full two hours before bed, and fill your plate with foods that help you fall asleep earlier in the night (think cherries, jasmine rice, and bananas).
In a nutshell: the plan uses 6 days of ketosis – when your body burns fats for energy – followed by 1 day of carbohydrate loading along with constant toxin binding supplements to help your body get rid of the released toxins.  This protocol isn’t low-calorie, and you don’t run the same risk of causing metabolic problems that you do when you follow a low-calorie diet.
Your body needs a certain amount of essential vitamins and minerals to function properly. What happens when you don’t get enough of them? What happens when you eat too little food, or when the food you eat isn’t sufficiently nutritious? Perhaps our bodies catch on and reply by increasing hunger levels. After all – if we eat more, we increase the chances of consuming enough of whatever nutrient we are lacking.
When you hit the gym, the body releases a fat-liberating messenger called epinephrine, which attaches itself to fat cells and allows fat to be burned as fuel. And, you guessed it, carbohydrates come into play here. Refined carbs consumed before training suppress the exercise- and supplement-induced rise in epinephrine compared to eating the same amount of slower-digesting carbs. Refined carbs also boost insulin levels, further hampering fat-burning during the workout. Bottom line, avoid refined carbs altogether before training.
Fat acids are a substrate for cholesterol, meaning that fatty acids must be available to create cholesterol. This is important because cholesterol is eventually converted to testosterone. If fat intake is too low there will not be enough fatty acids available for optimal testosterone productions. This will lead to an even lower level of testosterone.
There have been major obstacles along the way-mostly ones of my own doing and past disordered thoughts that pop up, but I have stayed the course. I have learned the program, asked questions, posted pics of myself after working out, shared in the group and gained so much support along the way. It has kept my mind in a healthy place. I was worried at the beginning that this wouldn't work just like so many other programs before it. But when I woke up this morning, I actually didn't care what the numbers were, I know I am not stopping now. Whatever they say, I will keep going, keep investing in me and investing in my family. I am a different me than I was 6 weeks ago, not just physically but mentally. I feel stronger and braver than I ever have. So thank you for this opportunity to be part of this program. It saved me in ways you may never know!
1. Boost your metabolism throughout the day: Your BMR regulates how many calories you burn at rest and the more you move, the higher your BMR, and the more you’ll burn when standing still. Small efforts like taking the stairs, walking to pick up lunch, even playing pool with the guys during happy hour can all jumpstart your metabolism. (Check out these 30 Easy Ways to Burn Fat in 30 Minutes Without the Gym.)

You don’t have to be the next Usain Bolt in the making to enjoy some serious belly-slimming results from hitting the track from time to time. Even a moderate-rate jog a few times a week can blast through that belly fat; in fact, a study conducted at Duke University Medical Center found that, over the course of an eight-month study, overweight adult study subjects who jogged 12 miles a week lost the most belly fat and burned 67 percent more calories than participants who did an equivalent amount of resistance exercise, or a combination of cardio and resistance work.

What about the calories? When they avoided eating between the hours of 7 p.m. to 6 a.m., participants reduced their daily calorie intake by an average of 238 calories. Which helps to explain the weight loss of almost half a pound a week. Interestingly, their intake of fat decreased significantly while protein and carbohydrate decreased at a more conservative rate. This leads one to believe that the subjects were not eating grilled chicken and broccoli late at night. No, their usual late-night snacks were much higher in fat.

Belly fat is, in fact, the colloquial term for abdominal fat. According to medical experts, belly fat can be potentially dangerous. Excess of it can lead to a number of health problems including heart diseases, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, a decrease in the level of HDL or good cholesterol, and can even lead to strokes or sleep apnea. You need to combat this problem before it gets too late.
Unfortunately, we can't target fat loss from any one place on our body. Instead, our bodies will use up fat from all over once we start losing weight--you could lose fat from your belly, hips, thighs, or arms before it starts to have an impact on fat around your face. Stay at a healthy overall weight and your face will suit you perfectly. And one perk to having fat on your face? Wrinkles will be much less pronounced.
There are those that claim HIIT is less effective than low intensity longer duration cardio. Their reasoning is that most of the calories burned during HIIT come from stored muscle glycogen (carbs) rather than coming from stored adipose tissue. This is true but this is not a bad thing. Research has absolutely proven that it does not make any difference whether stored carbohydrates or stored fats are used as the fuel source. The only thing that matters is how many total calories are burned and more total calories are expended through HIIT as opposed to low intensity low duration cardio.
Whether you sit or stand at work may play as big a role in your waistline as your fitness routine. Missouri University researchers discovered that inactivity (4 hours or more) causes a near shut- down of an enzyme that controls fat and cholesterol metabolism. To keep this enzyme active and increase your fat-burning, break up long periods of downtime by standing up—for example, while talking on the phone.
Fat metabolism is the most efficient way to produce energy, allowing you to go and go and go without burning through a ton of calories. But efficiency is the enemy of fat loss. To lose body fat, you want to churn through calories—calories from carbs, calories from fat, calories from anything—and you get there through carb metabolism. “The more energy-demanding the work, the more likely you are to lose body fat,” Zimmerman explains.
6 weeks ago we did our first juice cleanse and Lee was "embarrassed" to take his juice to a meeting, now he's actually talking to his guy friends and sharing what we aim for with nutrition and workouts, (this is more often at the pool or when we meet up for dinner) I'm so happy he is telling people and not writing it off as another one of my crazy ideas. He also gets excited that his clothes fit better and has repeatedly said how much he enjoys the "structure" of the circuits - something he didn't have before. I can attest to his better sleeping (asleep as I submit this), and if you don't tell, his bicep flexing he loves to do now (LOL). Overall he ended the first round down 9lbs and 5.5 inches collectively. Mindful eating when I'm not around and accountability on his part have been a huge win.
On January 1st of this year I weighed in at 244.5lbs and knew something had to change. My husband and I moved to a mostly paleo lifestyle and I quickly lost 40lbs. By the time summer hit I was bored and cheating way too much and had even put back on some weight. At that time my sister was doing the FWTFL and had phenomenal success. I decided to join her for the August round and I started the program weighing in at 212lbs. Once I got the hang of things I fell in love with the program. Hitting my macros daily was a fun challenge for me and I loved the variety of workouts and they way they built up over time. I noticed results almost immediately, especially in the stomach area. I only missed 1 workout during the whole program and grew to love my sweat sessions each day! I weighed in today at 194.5lbs. That's 17.5lbs of fat gone. My measurements show a 17" loss. It's just mind-blowing. I'm 10lbs under my lowest weight since having kids and I haven't felt this good in years. I am so thankful for this program and for what it has taught me about how to fuel my body properly and how to push it beyond its limits. The accountability groups kept me motivated and challenged and I can't wait to start round 2 and see even more results as I stay committed to this program!
The best tip I can give you on how to reroute yourself when you’re on your way to the bag of chips is to pause and think a little bit more about what you’re actually in the mood to eat — and what you’d really want if you could have absolutely ANYTHING. Do some strategic thinking and consider if it's the meal that you want, or if it's a specific spice or flavor. (Burritos? Maybe you just wanted some guac!)
Stress wreaks havoc on every part of your body, and can lead to breakouts, joint pain, headaches, and yes, even excess belly fat. That’s because when you’re stressed, your body pumps out extra cortisol, that not-so-great hormone you keep hearing about. Studies show that cortisol not only spikes your appetite, but may also redistribute body fat to your belly area, according to a review published in the journal Obesity.
“Most people overestimate the calories they burn on a run,” says Angela Rubin, USAT Level I triathlon coach and studio manager of Precision Running Lab at Equinox in Boston. As a very general estimation, you burn about 100 calories per mile (use this calculator to determine how many calories you burn based on your weight). So if you run two or three miles, you’ll burn about 200 to 300 calories—a solid workout.

Carbohydrates are extremely important to training since they are the primary fuel source for working muscles. During weight training the body uses ATP for energy. ATP is replenished through something called the glycolytic pathway. This pathway converts glucose into ATP. Glucose (carbohydrate) is obtained from the bloodstream or from carbs stored in the muscle tissue as glycogen.
I was four months postpartum with my fifth baby in seven years when my girlfriend, Katie, posted about this new program she was doing and how much she loves it. I had been stuck for weeks with no progress and was so tired of feeling so drained and uncomfortable in my own skin. I have gained {and lost} 70lbs with all five of my kids. Not from being lazy, or unhealthy, it’s just what my body does. But, five babies and losing weight looks a lot different. I was older, my body was tired, and I felt like I was never going to get this weight off. I tried the programs and foods I had tried in the past and instantly felt unmotivated and burnt out. I knew once I saw her results and talked about it with her I had to try. It was the best decision I could have made. Six weeks later I’m down 16 lbs, 11 inches, 2 pant sizes. Most importantly, I have the energy to keep up with my five young kids, teach my kindergarteners during the day, and finally feel comfortable in my own skin again. I’ve already gotten some of my girlfriends signed up for the next round, and I can’t wait to see where I am after another six weeks! This program changed my life when I truly felt like I wouldn’t ever get myself back. Thank you!
During low-intensity workouts like steady-state cardio, your body realizes the demand for energy isn’t urgent, so it taps into fat metabolism. The fats in your body (which contain vastly more energy than carbs) exist as triglycerides that float through your bloodstream and hang out within adipose or fat tissue. Because fat offers a slow-and-steady stream of energy, you’ll feel like you can sustain that effort for a long time, says Alex Zimmerman, CSCS, Los Angeles-based director of Equinox’s Tier X program.

How to make 20-minute baked salmon: Place one 8-oz salmon fillet in a baking dish. Season well with salt and pepper. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes at 400˚F. Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil and half a sliced garlic clove in a skillet. Add 3 ounces of baby spinach and toss to cook until spinach is wilted. Stir in half a teaspoons of fresh lemon juice. Serve salmon atop spinach.
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