When you drink liquid carbs, like the sugar in soda, your body doesn't register them the same way as, say, a piece of bread, according to a review of studies published in Current Opinion in Clinical Nutrition & Metabolic Care. That means, even though you're taking in calories, your fullness cues aren't likely to signal that you're satisfied once you finish off a can. And that can lead to consuming more overall.

We call it a beer gut for a reason: Your body tends to prioritize getting rid of any alcohol in your system, so it targets those calories first, which may impede fat burning, explains Hultin. Alcohol also tends to be higher in calories (7 per gram), and its inhibition-dissolving tendencies may lead you to overeat. Lose the booze, and you’ll likely lose more weight, too.

This results in lifting less weight for less reps while your in the gym. If you are not able to train as heavy due to energy needs this will surely lead to even greater muscle tissue loss. So if carbs are not available it will have a double whammy effect on muscle loss. Muscle tissue will be sacrificed to meet energy demands as well as muscle losses due to decreased training demands. You work hard for your muscle so don’t let it all go to waste.

This is one of the most important keys to weight loss and fat burning. You’ve heard it so many times before but the reality is – most people still don’t drink as much as the human body craves to function optimally! Drink water throughout the day and make your daily goal 64-80 ounces, during summer months you will lose more water through sweat so to hydrate during summer you may need to consumer more. The little tip you may not be aware of is that it is ideal to limit water intake while you’re eating meals – drink most of it between! If you drink too much while you’re eating, you’re making it harder for your body to digest and absorb the food which will make you much more hungry later. Your digestion works optimally when you are seated, and most of us tend not to be seated long enough. So do everything you can to help your digestion work optimally so you get the full absorption of what you are eating.
The prevailing formula for a long time on how much fat you’re going to burn was calories in minus calories out, based on your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and exercise efforts, explains strength and performance specialist Joel Seedman, Ph.D., owner of Advanced Human Performance in Atlanta. But with all the different biochemical reactions in the body, hormonal response, and endocrine function, there are an infinite number of factors that can affect how your body is storing and breaking down calories.
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