You don’t have to nix all carbs, just make sure you’re eating the right ones. A recent study published in Plant Foods and Human Nutrition found that after 12 weeks, men who ate only whole grains lost about an inch and a half off of their belly, while those who ate only refined grains didn’t lose any. Toss the white bread and pasta and stock up on complex carbs instead.

Unfortunately, some women are just more prone to carrying weight in their middle instead of their hips and thighs. Sometimes, it’s genetics—maybe your mother was more apple-shaped. Belly fat can also increase around menopause, or for women who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Even certain lifestyle habits, from lack of sleep to stress, can make your belly grow. To lose belly fat, talking with a doctor about what other factors may be affecting your weight gain can be a good place to start. From there, you can craft a belly fat busting routine.
A calorie isn’t always a calorie. Eating 100 calories of high fructose corn syrup, for example, can have a different effect on your body than eating 100 calories of broccoli. The trick for sustained weight loss is to ditch the foods that are packed with calories but don’t make you feel full (like candy) and replace them with foods that fill you up without being loaded with calories (like vegetables).
Always be sure to get enough protein and healthy fats to start your day. Your energy after a breakfast of 2/3 eggs, 1/3 – 1/2 an avocado and 1 piece of fruit or Breakfast Tacos will be significantly higher and sustain you longer than a carb-heavy bowl of cereal. Think about it this way – if you want to lessen the “carb-chase-cravings” and energy drops that often hit in the later mid-morning and/or late afternoon, the key is to increase your protein and healthy fats earlier in the day. Avocados and blueberries are great breakfast additions because they are nutrient rich superfoods that can easily be added to your daily diet.

Stand in front of the bar, shins touching metal, feet roughly shoulder-width apart. Squat down and grab the bar overhand, hands slightly wider than shoulder width and elbows straight. Draw your shoulders back, push your chest out, and tense your lats. Taking a deep breath, begin standing up, pushing heels into the ground and pulling your chest up. Keep the bar as close to your legs as possible. As soon as the bar passes your knees, push your hips forward with power, ending standing tall and straight with the bar in front of your groin. Slowly reverse the motion, making sure to keep your abs braced, and lower the bar to the floor.

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