To understand how far I have come in these 6 weeks, you would have to understand where I started. I weighed 210 lbs. This is the biggest I had ever been. I was lazy, never worked out and ate like crap. When I got married I weighed 140. That was 12 years ago. After having 2 children, like many moms, I just let myself go. My diet consisted of lots of fast food and lots of junk food. My daily routine included stopping at a fast food restaurant for a biscuit and large sweet tea every day on my way to work. I knew I was slowly killing myself. I was completely disgusted by the way i looked and felt, but I never made myself do anything different. In the past I had done all of the fad diets....weight watchers, low carb, low calorie, whole 30. I could do anything for a few weeks, but knew it was not something I would maintain in the long run. My weight constantly went up and down. About 8 weeks ago, my new friend Stacy shared with me about this program. She showed me her before and after pics. She assured me this was life changing and that I could do it. After much thought I jumped in and I am so glad I did. For 6 weeks I have worked out consistently. I have eaten so much better. Because of this I feel so much better! 

"Self-monitoring" refers to observing and recording some aspect of your behavior, such as calorie intake, servings of fruits and vegetables, amount of physical activity, etc., or an outcome of these behaviors, such as weight. Self-monitoring of a behavior can be used at times when you're not sure how you're doing, and at times when you want the behavior to improve. Self-monitoring of a behavior usually moves you closer to the desired direction and can produce "real-time" records for review by you and your health care provider. For example, keeping a record of your physical activity can let you and your provider know quickly how you're doing. When the record shows that your activity is increasing, you'll be encouraged to keep it up. Some patients find that specific self-monitoring forms make it easier, while others prefer to use their own recording system.


”In many ways, body fat is the same as food intake, it’s all available energy, and this is reflected in the fact that adipose tissue produces leptin. You can increase fat by 10-20g, and that’s another 90-180 calories your body “sees”, but gain 1lb of body fat and you’ve got 3500kcals that your body is seeing now…so yeah, changes in body fat can make much larger impacts than what you consume…that’s why I shake my head when guys freak out about going from 50g to 45g of dietary fat….really, you think the 45 calories per day is what is going to kill your libido, not the fact that you lost 10lbs (35,000kcals) of fat? ”

3. Tabata: Tabata is another form of interval training and involves 8 rounds of 20 seconds exercise followed by 10 seconds rest. Sounds easy enough but exercise should be done at a high intensity. This exercise can be done using rowing machines, dumbbells or thrusters. This is a tough exercise and is best for those who have very less time in their hands.
At its core, burning fat comes down to the process of lipolysis—the breaking down of fat lipids, explains Seedman. This happens in the mitochondria of the muscles, or the powerhouses of the cells, responsible for generating the energy our cells need to do their jobs. Exercise has been shown to improve mitochondria function, which then promotes fat breakdown, Seedman adds. Plus, working out helps regulate pretty much all the hormones that optimize fat loss.
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