The ideal divide between high- and low-intensity exercise depends on each person’s fitness levels, training history, and more. As a general rule, when trying to lose fat, use low-intensity cardiovascular exercise to warm up and cool down from high-intensity, circuit-style, or heavy strength workouts as well as a form of active recovery on rest days. 

I agree with Karina - if I were to calculate my daily calorie requirements based on your figures above (I’m somewhere between an echo and meso) I’d get fat using the lowest figure. Your calculations take no account of age and activity level inside or outside of the gym. I prefer to use a TDEE calculator to calculate my daily calorie needs (there you can add age, activity level, current body fat levels if known etc, for a far more accurate figure), and would suggest anyone looking to lose fat do the same and then come back to this article for information on macros etc.
While it may not be earth-shattering, there’s evidence to back up the advice that registered dietitians have been giving for decades. For many years, R.D.s have been urging weight-loss clients to eat dinner earlier and stop snacking a few hours before bed. It seemed like a no-brainer—after all, when was the last time a late-night binge consisted of a salad and carrot sticks?—but researchers from Brigham Young University decided to put the theory to the test.

I felt like I had a pretty good grasp on nutrition, but what mid 20-30s female doesn't suffer from constant pressure to be as skinny and fit as possible!? My first marriage was falling apart when I decided to pick up racing, and the training was a good escape. I had managed to get a little more fit with P90X but I really enjoyed my YMCA family more than Tony and sweating it out in a garage. Plus, I grew up in the south and truly enjoy experiencing food wherever we are (my mom should have been a pro, but my little brother is a chef! We really love to eat) I managed my fitness with Y memberships and what I thought was "balanced eating" but even in triathlons I needed a racing coach and a separate nutritionist. I know I was guilty of the "I rode 40 miles and ran 10" I can eat what I want mindset and luckily my mid 30's seemed to allow for that! Even though I experienced success and thought that the racing got me into the best shape I had been, I still felt all over the place with fitness and nutrition. Add in migraines, less an less "quality" sleep, fatigue and a metabolic panel suddenly all over the place, I was ready for something that was consistent, manageable, and did a lifestyle improvement rather than a quick fix.
If you're among the 30% of Americans who sleep less than six hours a night, here's one simple way to whittle your waistline: catch more Zs. A 16-year study of almost 70,000 women found that those who slept five hours or less a night were 30% more likely to gain 30 or more pounds than those who slept 7 hours. The National Institutes of Health suggest adults sleep seven to eight hours a night.
Good sleep hygiene can help. “Our ancestors needed to sleep when it was dark, quiet, and cool, Gillespie says. “That meant it was safe.” Despite technological advancements like heat and air conditioning, our bodies still crave those cave-like conditions. Draw the blinds, use a white noise generator, and keep the thermostat set between 63 and 68 degrees.
How to make 20-minute baked salmon: Place one 8-oz salmon fillet in a baking dish. Season well with salt and pepper. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes at 400˚F. Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil and half a sliced garlic clove in a skillet. Add 3 ounces of baby spinach and toss to cook until spinach is wilted. Stir in half a teaspoons of fresh lemon juice. Serve salmon atop spinach.

Want to lose that belly fat? In your dreams! Seriously, though: a good night’s sleep is one of the best ways to get rid of that extra fat around your waist for good. Among the 60,000 women participating in the Nurses’ Health Study, those who snoozed for fewer than five hours a night were at the greatest risk of becoming obese and gaining 30 or more pounds over the course of the 16-year study period when compared to those who slept for seven or more hours.


Carbohydrates also regulate muscle cell volume. You will notice that when carb intake is low your muscles will appear flat and smaller, because cell volume is diminished when carbs are restricted. This is because carbs are stored in muscle tissue as glycogen. Every gram of glycogen is stored with 2.7 grams of water. This can drastically effect the size of muscle cells.
Caffeine also has a dramatic effects on the adrenal glands. The adrenal glands regulate hormone levels within the body. Most notably of theses hormones are the “fight or flight” hormones adrenaline and noradrenaline. Caffeine causes a release of these hormones which will give a short term energy burst. The problem is when there is chronic stimulation of the adrenal glands. This will lead to adrenal burnout which can negatively effect energy levels, metabolism, and digestion.

The final possible culprit behind stubborn weight issues may be the stress hormone, cortisol. Too much cortisol will increase hunger levels, bringing along subsequent weight gain. The most common cause of elevated cortisol is chronic stress and lack of sleep (see tip #10), or cortisone medication (tip #9). It’s a good idea to try your best to do something about this.
While the Duke study found no added benefit to resistance training (aka weight or strength training) when it comes to belly fat, a 2014 study from a Harvard University team found otherwise. Twenty minutes of weights a day was linked to less of an increase in belly fat (particularly for older men). “Engaging in resistance training or, ideally, combining it with aerobic exercise could help older adults lessen abdominal fat while increasing or preserving muscle mass," said the paper’s lead author Rania Mekary.

The prevailing formula for a long time on how much fat you’re going to burn was calories in minus calories out, based on your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and exercise efforts, explains strength and performance specialist Joel Seedman, Ph.D., owner of Advanced Human Performance in Atlanta. But with all the different biochemical reactions in the body, hormonal response, and endocrine function, there are an infinite number of factors that can affect how your body is storing and breaking down calories.
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