Use the meal as a reward for a week’s worth of hard work, or the completion of a project you’ve been dreading. “It’s OK for people to blow one meal a week without feeling guilty,” says James W. Anderson, M.D., director of the Metabolic Research Group at the University of Kentucky in Lexington. “If you follow a healthy diet 95% of the time, you can relax and enjoy yourself the other 5% of the time without gaining weight.”
Stay away from the wrong kind of fat- Fats have unduly got a lot of flak in the recent past. But recently,the importance of good fats has gained prominence. Eat good fats like coconut oil, MCT oil, ghee and so on. Fats help in transporting fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K through the bloodstream to where they are needed.  They also raise good HDL cholesterol, lower bad LDL cholesterol, and protect against the buildup of plaque in your arteries. What’s more? They help prevent belly fat, according to research. Include good fats and definitely eliminate bad fats like vegetable oils, soybean oil and so on.

Don't get me wrong — exercising at any time is good for you. But evening activity may be particularly beneficial because many people's metabolism slows down toward the end of the day. Thirty minutes of aerobic activity before dinner increases your metabolic rate and may keep it elevated for another two or three hours, even after you've stopped moving. Plus, it'll help you relax post-meal so you won't be tempted by stress-induced grazing that can rack up calories.
a. Dandelion extract: Take this supplement to help you reduce water retention b. Drink coffee: Coffee contains caffeine and a healthy dose of it could help you burn more fat and lose excess water weight, according to several studies c. Keep a tab on your intolerances: Identify what your foods your body cannot tolerate and keep away from them. Lactose or gluten can lead to excess water retention and result in bloating. Hence, they can be completely avoided. 

Think of it like this: What words come to mind when you picture a movie theater? Popcorn? That's because you've linked the movie theater with eating popcorn. Eating to satisfy hunger is an appropriate reason to eat, while eating just because you're in a movie theater (or a room in your house) is not. These habits can seriously derail your weight loss efforts.
To stay motivated and deal with cravings, Juge has a couple of great recommendations. First, schedule a cheat meal on every seventh day. "Many of my clients have their cheat meal on Sunday, so then they're ready for Monday and the week to come," he says. If you feel deprived during the week, concentrate on the cheat meal to come, knowing you can eat absolutely anything you want to—pizza, lasagna, doughnuts, beer, chips, you name it. Remember, though, it's just one cheat meal, not an entire day of cheating. Afterward, get right back on the wagon with your next scheduled meal.
You already know that a perfect diet doesn't exist, but many of us still can't resist the urge to kick ourselves when we indulge, eat too much, or get thrown off course from restrictive diets. The problem: This only makes it more difficult, stressful, and downright impossible to lose weight. So rather than beating yourself up for eating foods you think you shouldn't, let it go. Treating yourself to about 200 calories worth of deliciousness each day — something that feels indulgent to you — can help you stay on track for the long haul, so allow yourself to eat, breathe, and indulge. Food should be joyful, not agonizing!
Eat regular meals or snacks every 2-4 hours. Skipping meals isn’t the answer to losing weight, and it may even derail your efforts. Food gives you energy, so going too long without eating can leave you feeling tired, which decreases your activity level. Additionally, it triggers your body to crave high-calorie, high-sugar snacks for a quick energy boost. Instead of starving yourself, plan frequent, healthy meals.[3]
You probably feel this way because if you cut junk food out completely and suddenly, your body is shocked by the sudden change. Also, junk food has a lot of sugar, which can make you feel energetic, so when you cut junk food out right away your body isn't used to not getting the sugar you used to consume. My advice is to take baby steps. Cut out candy/ice cream, then chips, then soda. etc. until you are consuming less or none at all.

Have a small, protein-heavy breakfast. Kickstart your day with a protein filled breakfast that will give you energy (and keep your blood sugar up) for the rest of the day. Aim for a breakfast that is 400 calories and eat it every morning at around the same time. Go for variety and rotate two to three options. Pair your breakfast with unsweetened tea or a glass of water with lemon.[6]

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