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We don’t always eat simply to satisfy hunger. All too often, we turn to food when we’re stressed or anxious, which can wreck any diet and pack on the pounds. Do you eat when you’re worried, bored, or lonely? Do you snack in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day? Recognizing your emotional eating triggers can make all the difference in your weight-loss efforts. If you eat when you’re:
Our increasingly slothful lifestyles are partly to blame for skyrocketing obesity rates, so it’s no surprise that being more active is a simple fix for belly fat. In 2003, a first-of-its-kind study from Duke University showed that sedentary adults accumulated abdominal fat surprisingly quickly — and that sedentary women stacked on fat more visceral fat than sedentary men, even though they added less fat overall.
Carbohydrates are almost as important as protein in the post workout shake. Carbs cause insulin release, and there is nothing better to lower cortisol levels that insulin. Insulin has an antagonist relationship with cortisol, meaning when insulin levels are high coritisol levels must be low. Also, since insulin is a storing hormone it will shuttle the amino acids from the whey protein directly into the muscle tissue.
3. Doing Bicycles not only help to melt belly fat it also works on the muscles of your upper body. For this you have to lie on your back and raise your legs at 90 degree, then bend your legs to 90 degree and hold it. Keep your hands under your head and slowly raise your head and shoulder off the ground. Now with a fast movement bring your right elbow to your left knee and extend your right leg in the front. You have to switch sides fast to create the cycling effect. Use your core muscles to keep your head and shoulder above the ground throughout the exercise. Do 20 repetitions and add 10 as you become stronger.
After training you need a rapidly digested protein shake to drive cortisol levels down and flip muscle growth into overdrive. Since this shake is so fast acting it will not keep protein synthesis sustained at a high level for long. To sustain protein synthesis you will need to consume a post training meal. 1-2 hours after training. This should be a whole food meal with protein and carbs while minimizing fat intake. This will maximize muscle growth by keeping protein synthesis levels high and reducing catabolism.
“Most people overestimate the calories they burn on a run,” says Angela Rubin, USAT Level I triathlon coach and studio manager of Precision Running Lab at Equinox in Boston. As a very general estimation, you burn about 100 calories per mile (use this calculator to determine how many calories you burn based on your weight). So if you run two or three miles, you’ll burn about 200 to 300 calories—a solid workout.

Research has shown that a large rush of amino acids into the blood stream post training will increase protein synthesis far greater than a steady flow of amino acids. This simply means that a fast digesting protein builds more muscle in the post workout state than a more slowly digested protein. For this purpose nothing beats whey protein. Whey protein is the fastest digesting protein there is, this should be your protein of choice for you post training shake.


The prevailing formula for a long time on how much fat you’re going to burn was calories in minus calories out, based on your basal metabolic rate (BMR) and exercise efforts, explains strength and performance specialist Joel Seedman, Ph.D., owner of Advanced Human Performance in Atlanta. But with all the different biochemical reactions in the body, hormonal response, and endocrine function, there are an infinite number of factors that can affect how your body is storing and breaking down calories.
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