Sleep quality matters as much as quantity, according to Gillespie. In general, an uninterrupted seven hours is better than 12 hours of tossing and turning. Of course, for new moms or others for whom sleep is hard to come by, naps are better than nothing. But if it’s possible to get your nightly sleep done in a solid block, that’s your best bet, she says.
Another thing that messes with circadian rhythms? The blue light of digital devices. “We have seen increasing scientific evidence that the more you use devices, the higher your risk of obesity,” says Gillespie. The reason is twofold: One, the more time you spend in front of a screen, the less time you’re running around and playing. But also, experts believe, the blue light these devices emit can disrupt your internal clock. One study found that using a blue light-emitting device before bed delayed the release of melatonin, a hormone responsible for sleep, and the effect carried over to the following night as well.
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Build more muscle: Cardio gets all the glory for melting fat, but it’s actually far more important to focus on building muscle. It’s pretty simple: Lipolysis happens in the mitochondria of the muscles, so the more muscle you have, the more mitochondria, and the more potential to burn. Plus, the more muscle mass you carry, the more your BMR is burning calories at rest. Strength training is also one of the strongest ways to spark production of testosterone and growth hormone, which both help to break down fat, Seedman adds.
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