Don’t let extra hours lounging in bed stand between you and a flatter belly. While getting enough sleep can help boost your metabolic rate, sleeping in may undo any benefit you’d enjoy from catching a few extra winks. One study reveals that late sleepers who snoozed past 10:45 in the morning ate nearly 250 more calories over the course of the day, despite eating half as many fruits and vegetables as their early bird counterparts. Even worse, they chowed down on more salty, sugary, and trans fat-laden fast food than those who woke up earlier. If you happen to head out of the house early, you’re in for an additional metabolic boost; researchers at Northwestern University have found that people exposed to just a short period of early morning sunlight had lower BMIs than their late-waking counterparts.
I accepted the fact that I wasn't going anywhere with my over excessive workouts and lack of nutrition, and the stubborn fat deposits forming on my tummy and hips that weren't going anywhere no matter what I did. I was finally coming to the conclusion that at 53, going through menopause that I could no longer count on the genetics given to me would sustain my body anymore. It was time to get serious and figure out what in the world to do about it. That's when a forever friend Lisa Cole changed my life by introducing me to the fasterwaytofatloss program. Her results were incredible! She was fit, happy and in control of a sustainable fitness/ nutrition program and I wanted in. It was just what I was looking for. I signed up and her sister Jennifer Morgan was also just starting the program. Jen and I have been forever friends since 1st grade! ❤️ Her results were also Amazing and all she kept saying was "I am Soooo happy!"
Think of the typical toppings on your baked potato -- butter, sour cream, maybe cheese and bacon bits. If you substitute a sweet potato, you might not need any of that. Baked sweet potatoes are so full of flavor, they don't need a lot, unless you want to try a sprinkle of cinnamon. This can save you loads of calories. As a bonus, sweet potatoes are packed with potassium, beta-carotene, vitamin C, and fiber.
A diet that’s low in fat and carbohydrates can improve artery function, according to a 2012 study by Johns Hopkins researchers. After six months, those on the low-carb diet had lost more weight, and at a faster pace. But in both groups, when weight was lost—and especially when belly fat shrank—the arteries were able to expand better, allowing blood to travel more freely. The study shows that you don’t have to cut out all dietary fat to shrink belly fat. For heart health, simply losing weight and exercising seems to be key. 
Lack of sleep throws your body’s hormone levels off balance which then impacts your hunger levels the next day. The 2 hormones that affect our appetite are ghrelin (the hormone that makes us feel hungry) and leptin (the hormone that makes us feel full). When we don’t get enough sleep, the level of ghrelin rises while our leptin levels drop. This causes you to feel hungry and overeat.

While many people turn to artificial sweeteners in a misguided attempt to whittle their waistlines, those fake sugars are likely to have the opposite effect. According to researchers at Yale, artificial sweeteners are actually linked with an increased risk of abdominal obesity and weight gain, possibly because they can trigger cravings for the real stuff and spike insulin levels in a similar fashion to real sugar.
Always be sure to get enough protein and healthy fats to start your day. Your energy after a breakfast of 2/3 eggs, 1/3 – 1/2 an avocado and 1 piece of fruit or Breakfast Tacos will be significantly higher and sustain you longer than a carb-heavy bowl of cereal. Think about it this way – if you want to lessen the “carb-chase-cravings” and energy drops that often hit in the later mid-morning and/or late afternoon, the key is to increase your protein and healthy fats earlier in the day. Avocados and blueberries are great breakfast additions because they are nutrient rich superfoods that can easily be added to your daily diet.
Intentional weight loss is the loss of total body mass as a result of efforts to improve fitness and health, or to change appearance through slimming. Weight loss in individuals who are overweight or obese can reduce health risks,[1] increase fitness,[2] and may delay the onset of diabetes.[1] It could reduce pain and increase movement in people with osteoarthritis of the knee.[2] Weight loss can lead to a reduction in hypertension (high blood pressure), however whether this reduces hypertension-related harm is unclear.[1][not in citation given]
All of this is important to understand because while the basics of changing your body composition are simple –energy balance– each person’s personal psychology and physiology will differ. Someone who’s never exercised before and has a lot of fat to lose will have different physiological and psychological requirements than someone who stopped training for a while and gained some body fat in the interim; conversely, a lean beginner is going to be in a different place than an overweight beginner.
Stand in front of the bar, shins touching metal, feet roughly shoulder-width apart. Squat down and grab the bar overhand, hands slightly wider than shoulder width and elbows straight. Draw your shoulders back, push your chest out, and tense your lats. Taking a deep breath, begin standing up, pushing heels into the ground and pulling your chest up. Keep the bar as close to your legs as possible. As soon as the bar passes your knees, push your hips forward with power, ending standing tall and straight with the bar in front of your groin. Slowly reverse the motion, making sure to keep your abs braced, and lower the bar to the floor.
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