We don’t always eat simply to satisfy hunger. All too often, we turn to food when we’re stressed or anxious, which can wreck any diet and pack on the pounds. Do you eat when you’re worried, bored, or lonely? Do you snack in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day? Recognizing your emotional eating triggers can make all the difference in your weight-loss efforts. If you eat when you’re:


I joined the August FWTFL group knowing that I was ready, both mentally and emotionally, to make some big changes. Two small kids, a full-time business, and just life in general have been so busy for the past several years that I have not consistently made the time to prioritize my own fitness and health. I knew I needed structure and accountability, but also the freedom to LIVE life and enjoy the things that are important to me (such as a glass of wine on occasion, dinners out at restaurants with the family, and fun social events) without constantly feeling deprived. I’ve tried those other exercise and food plans and just could never make them “stick” long-term because they did not fit my life.  
Carbohydrates are almost as important as protein in the post workout shake. Carbs cause insulin release, and there is nothing better to lower cortisol levels that insulin. Insulin has an antagonist relationship with cortisol, meaning when insulin levels are high coritisol levels must be low. Also, since insulin is a storing hormone it will shuttle the amino acids from the whey protein directly into the muscle tissue.
At its core, burning fat comes down to the process of lipolysis—the breaking down of fat lipids, explains Seedman. This happens in the mitochondria of the muscles, or the powerhouses of the cells, responsible for generating the energy our cells need to do their jobs. Exercise has been shown to improve mitochondria function, which then promotes fat breakdown, Seedman adds. Plus, working out helps regulate pretty much all the hormones that optimize fat loss.
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