Some people truly love doing cardio while others absolutely despise it. No matter which side you are on the only that matters is that you have to do cardio if you are serious about getting lean. When I say cardio I am not talking about taking the stairs instead of the elevator at work. Low intensity cardio is not going to give you the real results you are after. For serious fat loss you need serious cardio.
For me I am working on a total mindset shift - "not comparing my week 3 to someone's week 20" as one of the FTWFL coaches recently posted in a video. Have I seen the start of results from improved cleaner eating habits/balanced meals, tried new foods to be GF, dairy free, and all but drinking my coffee black (oh the humanity!), embraced those weekly small non scale victories and begun a lifestyle change? Yes! Have I ended up with those long desired abs, wearing all those shorts and skirts that are a size down and ditching all my bad food habits after just 6 weeks? No, but I am down 4lbs of my goal of 10#, seeing improved upper body definition and a loss of a few inches overall. A few things fit better, friends and family have noticed, and I don't beat myself us AS much as I used to. I enjoy cooking and trying new foods so the cookbooks and idea/meal sharing have been such a plus. Moreover, when I share this program and journey I am constantly telling people that the coaches are REAL people, with emails, facebook, videos - with a family, activities, cute tops from TJ Maxx and a shared love of donuts! I know we have room to improve and room to grow, but this is manageable as a couple and a lifestyle that I plan to keep. I know as a couple we have each others backs and selfishly we want to stay in shape and sexy for each other - but I also know we want a healthy mind and body to enjoy that time together. I'm glad I didn't keep scrolling blindly through the posts I found, and have had the chance to grow in my fitness journey with plans to continue with Amanda after this next round. If I can inspire and change the lives of 1/10 the number of people you all have reached I will consider that a huge win.
It's the age-old question: How many sets do you need, and how much time should you spend in the gym each day? The answer varies from person to person, but when burning fat is the primary goal, a good rule of thumb is to train until you're pretty beat up, but not to the point at which you're flattened and thoroughly exhausted. That type of kamikaze training may satisfy your pysche, but it does a number on your anabolic hormones.
2. Boxing: I let my clients do boxing as I feel that it’s a great way to pump up your heart rate and increase sweating. Higher the heart rate the more calories they’ll be burning. Usually I instruct my clients to do one minute of punches or combinations usually on boxing pads but can also be done on a punch bag followed by 30 seconds rest. Usually I repeat this exercise several times until my clients are fit. Then I let them hold the plank in between rounds as an active rest.
‘Do it for a couple of minutes in bed and you’ll actually be able to wind down and fall asleep more easily. But it’s a skill, so it requires a commitment to practice it, as with anything. Think of it a bit like dating – the first time you do it it’s terrible, it’s uncomfortable, nobody knows what they’re doing, but the more dates you go on the better it gets.
Although insulin in anti-lypolytic, meaning it blunts fat burning, the goal post training is to spike insulin levels for the sake of muscle growth. The best way to cause an insulin spike is by using high glycemic carbs such as dextrose, glucose, or maltodextrin. These carbs cause a rapid rise in blood sugar and will therefore cause the greatest insulin response.
The scale is not necessarily your friend. You may want to lose fat – but the scale measures muscles, bone and internal organs as well. Gaining muscle is a good thing. Thus weight or BMI are imperfect ways to measure your progress. This is especially true if you’re just coming off a long period of semi-starvation (calorie counting), as your body may want to restore lost muscles etc. Starting weight training and gaining muscle can also hide your fat loss.

Sure, you can lose weight quickly. There are plenty of fad diets that work to shed pounds rapidly -- while leaving you feeling hungry and deprived. But what good is losing weight only to regain it? To keep pounds off permanently, it's best to lose weight slowly. And many experts say you can do that without going on a "diet." Instead, the key is making simple tweaks to your lifestyle.
You will find that you lose up to 8 lbs quickly, which is your glycogen (and water) going down. Then you will plateau for a few days. I recommend you weigh-in only once per week, which will stop the emotional ups and downs. The mirror is your scale the rest of the time. The weight will come off in chunks after that. Nothing for a couple days, then sometimes 3-5 lbs in one day. It just keeps happening. But the mirror never lies.

Digestive metabolism, or thermic effect of food (TEF): Simply digesting food—turning carbs into sugar and turning protein into amino acids—typically burns 10 to 15 percent of your daily calories. Digesting protein burns more calories than digesting carbohydrates or fat—about 25 calories for every 100 consumed. Digesting carbohydrates and fat burns about 10 to 15 calories for every 100 consumed.
The Grey Box of Clarification: While my earlier comment about ‘sucking it up’ was slightly facetious, there is a lot of truth to it. Hunger is an inevitable part of dieting and the more you can become comfortable with it, the more successful you’re going to be with your fat loss. Also, read this. And then sign up to my email list because it’s the best thing since Deadpool. 
Insulin is another very important reason to keep carbohydrates in your diet. Carb consumption causes the body to release the hormone insulin. Insulin has gotten a bad reputation as of late because it inhibits fat loss by preventing fat from being used as an energy source. I know what you are thinking, “Why would I want high insulin levels if it inhibits fat loss?”. While this may sound like a bad thing the benefits of insulin far outweigh the drawbacks.
BCAA’s work with a double sided attack on fat loss. First by increasing muscle growth which will eventually lead to an increased metabolism, secondly by increasing fat utilization within the body. This makes BCAA’s one of the most effective supplements on the market. To get the most benefit out of your BCAA supplementation it is best to consume 8-12 grams during training and another 10-20 grams throughout the day in between meals. This will optimize both muscle retention and fat loss.

Seedman recommends eating at least 1.5 to 2 grams of protein per pound of body weight, and scoring it from quality sources like lean meats, eggs, fish, and protein powders. And when in doubt, eat more protein. “Of all the macronutrients to overdo it on, protein is it because excessive amounts are more difficult for your body to turn into fat compared to carbs or fat,” he adds.
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