As you get older, your body changes how it gains and loses weight. Both men and women experience a declining metabolic rate, or the number of calories the body needs to function normally. On top of that, women have to deal with menopause. "If women gain weight after menopause, it's more likely to be in their bellies," says Michael Jensen, MD, professor of medicine in the Mayo Clinic's endocrinology division. In menopause, production of the hormones estrogen and progesterone slows down. Meanwhile, testosterone levels also start to drop, but at a slower rate. This shift in hormones causes women to hold onto weight in their bellies. The good news: you can fight this process. Read on.
Based on your results, a specialist will determine if you burn fat well or not. According to Dr. Arad, "If you're able to burn fat well, do a type of exercise that maximizes fat-burning, like a moderate-intensity run." If your results show that you don't burn fat well, "You may benefit from doing high-intensity exercise, like high-intensity interval training," Dr. Arad said.
But if it's a person who always seems to find you at 4:58 p.m., your level of comfort telling Bob what’s what will determine your self-care promoting action. Put this in your calendar so that you know — even if you’re exhausted/hangry/busier than ever and have Bob clamoring at your office door — that this is a priority for you. Then, follow your Ulysses contract for tonight and tomorrow by saying, "See you tomorrow, Bob!"

At its core, burning fat comes down to the process of lipolysis—the breaking down of fat lipids, explains Seedman. This happens in the mitochondria of the muscles, or the powerhouses of the cells, responsible for generating the energy our cells need to do their jobs. Exercise has been shown to improve mitochondria function, which then promotes fat breakdown, Seedman adds. Plus, working out helps regulate pretty much all the hormones that optimize fat loss.
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