Don't let extra hours lounging in bed stand between you and a flatter stomach. While getting enough sleep can help boost your metabolic rate, sleeping in may undo any benefit you'd enjoy from catching a few extra winks. One Obesity study reveals that late sleepers who snoozed past 10:45 in the morning ate nearly 250 more calories over the course of the day, despite eating half as many fruits and vegetables as their early bird counterparts. Even worse, they chowed down on more salty, sugary, and trans-fat-laden fast food than those who woke up earlier. If you happen to head out of the house early, you're in for an additional metabolic boost; researchers at Northwestern University have found that people exposed to just a short period of early morning sunlight had lower BMIs than their late-waking counterparts.

Almonds, peanuts, walnuts, pistachios — at GH, we're nuts about nuts! People who snack on nuts may have lower abdominal fat than those who munch on carb-based treats, according to a 2015 study in the Journal of the American Heart Association. Nuts are rich in monounsaturated fats, a heart-healthy (and more satisfying) pick than their grain-based counterparts.
Increasing your daily physical activity could help you lose weight faster and burn extra calories. Your overall daily activities impact your fitness level to a great extent and also helps combat obesity and weight-loss. If you're doing a desk job as compared to a manual job, your sedentary work life could mean that you're unable to burn up to 1,000 calories per day. This amounts to the same as 90-120 minutes of high-intensity exercise at the gym. You could incorporate simple lifestyle changes such as walking or cycling to nearby destinations, taking stairs instead of elevators, standing more often or even helping out in household chores. You'd be surprised at the calories you could burn by following these simple changes.
If how to lose weight is a question that's been on your mind in 2018, we're here to help you answer it. Since the New Year always calls for a fresh start, because that's what New Year resolutions are all about, this is a good time to kick some old habits to the curb and adopt some healthy new ones. More often than not, the things you'd like to achieve in the coming 12 months are unfinished business from 2017 that you've carried with you into 2018. One of these things, without a doubt, is your never-ending quest to figure out how to lose weight. So, to help you achieve your weight loss target for the year as early as possible, we're letting you in on an exercise and diet routine that could change your life for the better. Not only will it help you drop weight but it will also help you achieve your fitness goals much earlier than you thought you ever could.
Habits and cravings are the devil when it comes to dieting. Let's first deal with habits. Juge explains that it takes a good week or two to ease into dieting. "Fast food is so easy and there's a McDonald's on every corner. The hardest thing is to develop the new habit of preparing your meals and taking them with you." The first week is the most difficult, so prepare yourself for some challenges as you abandon your usual routine. For example, you might usually go out for a sub sandwich or burger at lunch. You'll now have to bring your food with you and resist the temptation of spicing up your meal with the Doritos in the vending machine or your usual can of Coke. It can be a real mental battle to stick to your food plan.
And maybe a new mattress, because it’s not just the amount of time you spend sleeping that keeps you lean, it’s also the quality of your sleep. Fat cells in your body produce a hormone called leptin that helps the body keep track of how much potential energy (i.e. fat) it has stored. But leptin is only produced during certain stages of sleep. Miss out on those stages because you’re not resting soundly enough, and you’ll disturb levels of the hormone, leaving your body with no real idea of its energy reserves. Consequently, you’ll end up storing calories rather than burning them.
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