Protein is an absolute must have after training since it is the only thing that can immediately shift your body from a catabolic state to an anabolic state. The period right after training is commonly referred to as the anabolic window because the body is ultra sensitive to nutrients for 2 hours after training. This is prime time for muscle growth.
Sure, calories and hormones can determine whether your body deposits food into muscle or as body fat, but meal frequency, or how many times you eat each day, affects your overall metabolism. Every time you eat, the body's calorie-burning engine, also known as metabolism, slightly increases. This is especially true for meals that contain protein. So if you eat six times a day, you'll experience six metabolic surges a day, rather than just four if you eat only four times a day. And, of course, eating seven or eight times per day would be even better than six. This is one way to lean out without having to drastically reduce calories. Frequent feedings tend to increase the chance that what you eat will make its way into muscle tissue rather than being packed away as body fat.
Some antidepressant medications can cause weight gain, especially the older tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) such as Tryptizol, Saroten, and Clomipramine; as well as newer drugs such as Remeron (Mirtazapine). Lithium (for manic-depressive disorder) often causes weight gain. The most common antidepressants known as SSRI’s (for example Citalopram and Sertraline) usually don’t impact weight significantly. More on depression

2. Ab Plank is a great exercise to really challenge your entire core and build up your strength and endurance. The Plank works the lower abdomens, the oblique muscles and your lower back. It takes focus and concentration plus some upper body strength. Start with holding the plank position for 30- 40 seconds and build your way up. You will be amazed at how strong your cores will get by doing this exercise regularly.
Do not try to lose weight too rapidly. Crash diets and diet pills that promise weight loss are usually bad for you and actually don't help keep the weight off in the long run. Resist the urge to take the "easy" way out and instead stick with a healthier lifestyle. This way you lose the weight and improve your health, helping you keep the weight off in a way that won't harm you in the long run.

Good protein sources include chicken and turkey breast (without skin), pork tenderloin, lean beef (filet mignon, steak sirloin, flank steak), lean ground meats (90/10 or leaner), eggs (yolks and whites), fish (salmon, tuna, mackerel, tilapia, cod), seafood, low-fat dairy (Greek yogurt, milk, cheese), whey and casein protein, soy (tofu, edamame, seitan), beef, and vegetable protein powders.

There’s mounting evidence that our body’s natural internal clocks, or circadian rhythms, drive a lot of our biological processes, including weight maintenance. They tend to sync up with daylight. That could be why studies have shown that shift workers tend to have a higher rate of obesity and weight gain—their body clocks are out of sync. One study even found that a third of people who experienced an interrupted sleep cycle for less than two weeks became prediabetic; all of the poor sleepers saw markers for the risk of obesity and type two diabetes climb.
2. Eat smaller meals more frequently: “Insulin is probably the single most important factor that contributes to fat storage,” Seedman explains. This hormone is activated when you eat and responsible for shuttling nutrients into cells, either fat or muscle. A quick biology lesson: Every time you eat a meal, your blood glucose spikes, and when this goes up, so do your insulin levels. More calories at once means a larger spike in both. When these levels are sky high, it signals to your body to put nutrients into fat cells instead of muscle, causing an accumulation of fat, Seedman explains. The same thing happens when your insulin stays elevated for a prolonged period of time, which is why it’s important to let yourself become hungry before eating again, he adds. Aim for five to six meals throughout the day.

This fat-burning magic comes from your metabolism, a word you've probably heard tossed around a lot but maybe don't quite understand. What is metabolism? Simply put, it's all the various chemical reactions that happen inside your body, 24-7, that keep you alive. It's food being turned into energy and that energy being burned off to keep your hair growing, your heart beating, your liver pumping out bile, your lungs transferring oxygen into your bloodstream and your intestines turning Amstel Light into urine (not that there's a huge leap there).
It’s bad for every part of your body.  Your body is actually breaking down, your relationships suffer, your brain doesn’t work right, your joints hurt, you lose muscle, and you just don’t look good in the mirror.  Conventional wisdom says you should start cutting fat and calories and run on a treadmill for an hour a day. Then you’re made to feel as if it’s your fault because their advice doesn’t work.
Nighttime snacking may be even worse than we thought. When researchers fed rats the same number and kind of calories but varied whether they ate them over an eight- to ten-hour period or a 15- to 24-hour span, the late night diners became obese while the rats who noshed only during the day lost weight. While they haven’t identified exactly why this occurred, they believe it has something to do with eating in line with circadian rhythms, or our bodies’ natural internal clocks, which can be triggered by environmental conditions such as sunlight. When researchers repeated the study with humans they got similar results—seems like a good idea to quit eating at sundown.
If you could only be a fly on the wall in our kitchen each night after dinner. We are both on My Fitness Pal planning our food for the next day and weighing and measuring our portions. It is fun to meal plan together. I make the meal plan on Sunday and my hubby prepares the majority of the food. Firemen sure do know how to cook! Maybe that is why I married him. 
Our journey started years ago when life decided to throw us into emotional turmoil. As a couple, we desired and longed to have children. Our hopes were shattered when we found out the little girl that we had prayed for had a terminal disease that was not compatible with life. We lost our little girl on Thanksgiving Day. We both began to lose site of our physical health as we were in survival mode. Emotional eating took over. A couple of years after we lost our daughter, my father in law committed suicide which again sent our family into a spiral of unhealthy choices as we were trying to cope with tremendous loss. Our physical health was of no importance as we were trying to heal emotionally. We were consumed by many unhealthy habits that temporarily made us feel better. Fast forward a couple of more years, and I was diagnosed with an extremely rare tumor in my low back. After my first surgery, the tumor returned aggressively within 3 months and my treatment options were small. At this time we realized that our health is nothing to take for granted. We had 2 small children that needed healthy parents. After years of abusing our bodies with unhealthy foods and lack of exercise, we decided to get serious about our health. Shawn worked out and I struggled to find a program that would actually work. Shawn was not a "program" type of guy but I needed structure and something to follow. I had tried so many things and nothing seemed to work. I was struggling with chronic pain and I seemed to never be able to complete anything because my body wasn't allowing it. I found the FWTFL program on a blog and started researching. The premise made sense to me, but I still needed direction. Shawn bought the first round for my Mother's Day gift and I knew this was my last hope. I was amazed that within the first 3 weeks, the pain in my low back and hip was so much better. My body was allowing me to work hard and I was getting stronger. I think the progressive workouts combined with whole food nutrition was key. My body was responding well. I wanted to continue because I knew it would only get better! After the first 6 weeks, I was a changed person. Emotionally, I felt amazing....for the first time in years. I felt confident and I could see awesome physical changes. I signed up for the second round and this is where Shawn entered the picture. He was so impressed with the changes I saw in the first round that he wanted to give the Men's Group a shot. I think for us, we wanted the physical changes in our appearance but it became so much more. My body was actually healing from the chronic pain and THAT was the selling point for Shawn. Because I am still battling this tumor, I have MRI's every 4 months. My last scan showed that what I was feeling was real. I have been battling bursitis in both hips for years. My last scan show this was totally gone. That is a huge win. This program not only gives you results physically but it allows your body to be as healthy as it can possibly be! Shawn was impressed and decided it was time for him to take control of his health as well. Together, we endured the loss of our baby, the loss of a father and we have battled for my health. Together, we ate clean, never missed a workout and pushed each other to be the best, healthiest we could possibly be. Together, we will continue to make healthy choices and live a life that will push others to do the same. We are both thankful for the knowledge that Amanda shared with us. It has given us the ability to take control of our emotional and physical health. We are two grateful people that share a passion for life and we do not take our health or each other for granted! We appreciate this opportunity!

Standing with feet hip-width apart, hold the barbell at chest height with palms facing up and your elbows extended out in front of you. Keeping the barbell rested at your chest, squat deep. In one explosive movement, push up into standing, tilting head back slightly to surge the barbell straight overhead so knees and elbows are both locked straight. Lower barbell back down to shoulders and repeat.

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