Nuts, the second food to watch, contain a fair amount of carbohydrate, and it’s very easy to unwittingly scarf down large quantities. Cashew nuts are among the worst carb-wise – you’ll find that they contain around 20% carbohydrate by weight. For someone following a strict keto diet with a 20 grams of carbs per day allowance, this means that consuming 100 grams (which happens in a flash!) will have filled their daily quota. Peanuts tend to be around 10-15% carbohydrate – not putting them in the clear either.
We now know that this type of fat, called visceral fat, is metabolically active and churns out stress hormones like cortisol and inflammatory substances called cytokines that affect you body’s production of insulin. The result is worse than just being generally overweight; you’re looking at increased risks of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, stroke, some cancers, and even dementia.
I found Amanda IG page months ago through another page I was following. I snooped around to see what it was all about and tucked the information in the back of head. I have tried and failed so many diets in the past and my health has been affected each time. I grow more tired, more fluffy, less motivated and more discouraged. But I can't live there- I have 2 young daughters and I don't want my food and body issues to become their food and body issues.
REALITY: Fats and carbs both play a role in fat loss. Fats are responsible for hormone production, joint lubrication, and many other important health and muscle-building factors. Dropping your fats too low could compromise your health and your goals. Everyone's body and metabolism is different, so it's crucial to know how many grams of healthy fat you need to eat for a balanced nutrition regimen.
When we decided Nick should join the FWTFL through the first Men’s program, we thought it would just be a way to help support each other through the process, especially to provide additional accountability to avoid stress eating. Prior to the FWTFL, every time our son would have his quarterly brain MRIs, a follow up appointment, or a scary fall at daycare- we would immediately begin stress eating. The awful food choices started a cycle in which we would stress eat, feel gross because of the fatty processed foods, then go to bed, sleep awful, wake up and do it all over again. Our days were full of processed foods, large portions, and increasing displeasure in the way our bodies looked, especially at such young ages (26 & 30). After I had successfully completed 3 weeks of the women’s FWTFL with Amanda, Nick was ready to join the Men’s version so we BOTH looked better, and more importantly FELT better. During our FWTFL cycles, we faced our son’s one year “cancer-versary” along with his scan and follow up appointment. For the first time in the last year, we felt in control. Not just of our food, but of our lives, as we were always REACTING to bad news, bad days, etc. and now we were able to take control of our choices and especially our bodies. Yes, we have seen victories on the scale, and in the form of inches lost. BUT our non scale victories have been SIGNIFICANTLY more amazing and impressive. We have more energy to play with our three kids, we are in better moods, and are happier throughout the day, we don’t get “hangry” like we used to, and most importantly for us, we don’t eat out of stress. We eat to fuel our bodies appropriately for the right reasons. We are also saving money as a NSV, as we were eating out 3-4 days PER WEEK, and now we are cooking more than ever at home- and I. ATE. SALAD! I used to hate the idea of anything green, and last week I bought and ATE salad on my own. Nick is no longer drinking Energy Drinks (he used to drink 1-2/day for the last 10 years) and hasn’t had A SINGLE DRINK since starting the FWTFL, and doesn’t NEED the energy. I am no longer drinking soda, which I can easily say was an addiction, as I needed the caffeine in order to stay awake because my body was SO out of whack.
This may explain why the fat-burning effects of eating more protein were confirmed in a study published in the American Journal of Physiology. One group was fed a high-protein diet (just over 1 gram per pound of body weight per day) while the second group consumed an amount closer to the lower recommendation of the RDA (recommended dietary allowance). The group eating the higher-protein diet burned the most fat.
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