Keeping a toothbrush handy can do more than polish up that smile (and counter the effects of all that belly-slimming garlic); brushing your teeth throughout the day can also help you ditch that belly fat fast. A study conducted a sample of over 14,000 participants found that brushing after every meal was linked to lower weight. That minty toothpaste flavor not only clashes with virtually every food, brushing may also trigger a Pavlovian response that tells your brain the kitchen's closed.
You're busy. No question. But are you as busy as you think? It's time to take a good look at how you're spending your time—you may be able to reorganize activities or eliminate them altogether (you'll be amazed at how free you evenings suddenly become just by clicking off the TV). You've probably heard the following advice before, but have you really tried them? Now's your chance.

While few would suggest you start hitting up the tanning beds for better health, getting some natural sunlight can help you get rid of belly fat in a matter of weeks. Researchers at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center found that vitamin D-deficient overweight women between 50 and 75 who upped their intake of the so-called sunshine vitamin shed more weight and body fat than those who didn't. To practice safe sun, make sure you're limiting yourself to 15 sunscreen-free minutes per day.
Identify your food triggers and plan accordingly. Everyone has food triggers, so don’t feel bad about craving certain foods. Cut back on these foods by figuring out the things that trigger your cravings, like a certain activity, a time of day, or feeling certain emotions. Then, plan for better ways to handle those triggers, and don’t keep these foods around your home or workplace. This can help you avoid giving into temptation.[6]
Add a cup of low-fat milk, a part-skim mozzarella stick, or a half cup of low-sodium cottage cheese to breakfast, and you may have a belly-busting win. While lots of research links calcium with lower body weights, results from a 2014 study suggest that calcium-containing foods may reduce waist circumference in those genetically predisposed to carrying weight in their midsection.
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