Harley acknowledged that "jumping 1,000 steps per day each week can be daunting" and that not everyone is starting at 10,000 steps each day. If you're hovering somewhere closer to 5,000 steps daily, the goal is the same. Add 1,000 steps per day for week one, another 1,000 for week two, and so on until your new daily average is 4,000 steps above your start point.
5. Hydroxycitric Acid (HCA): The name sounds scary, but this supplement is derived from a salt in a Southeast Asian fruit plant. And the perks are real: HCA can help decrease the amount of visceral, subcutaneous, and total fat on your body, according to a study in the Journal of Obesity. It works by suppressing your appetite, reducing the amount of fat your body absorbs from your diet, and increasing your metabolism. 
Don’t think going low-carb on the overfeed day is going to improve the results. It will make them worse. You do not need to avoid fat, but you do need to work on making sweet potatoes, yams, and white rice the bulk of your diet for this one day. You can drown your sweet potatoes in butter or not; it doesn’t matter as long as you eat the potatoes.  It’s important to choose glucose based carb sources like sweet potatoes and Taro over fruit. Fructose is 10-20% more lipogenic (fat forming) during overfeeding than glucose.

If you're dehydrated, it can be hard to tell if you're hungry or just thirsty. If you're craving a mid-day snack, have a glass of water and wait a few minutes before reassessing how hungry you really are. Water also helps food move through your digestive system, lessening feelings of bloating. It's a good idea to keep a water bottle with you throughout the day. Add in cucumber slices or fresh fruit to infuse flavor.

When we decided Nick should join the FWTFL through the first Men’s program, we thought it would just be a way to help support each other through the process, especially to provide additional accountability to avoid stress eating. Prior to the FWTFL, every time our son would have his quarterly brain MRIs, a follow up appointment, or a scary fall at daycare- we would immediately begin stress eating. The awful food choices started a cycle in which we would stress eat, feel gross because of the fatty processed foods, then go to bed, sleep awful, wake up and do it all over again. Our days were full of processed foods, large portions, and increasing displeasure in the way our bodies looked, especially at such young ages (26 & 30). After I had successfully completed 3 weeks of the women’s FWTFL with Amanda, Nick was ready to join the Men’s version so we BOTH looked better, and more importantly FELT better. During our FWTFL cycles, we faced our son’s one year “cancer-versary” along with his scan and follow up appointment. For the first time in the last year, we felt in control. Not just of our food, but of our lives, as we were always REACTING to bad news, bad days, etc. and now we were able to take control of our choices and especially our bodies. Yes, we have seen victories on the scale, and in the form of inches lost. BUT our non scale victories have been SIGNIFICANTLY more amazing and impressive. We have more energy to play with our three kids, we are in better moods, and are happier throughout the day, we don’t get “hangry” like we used to, and most importantly for us, we don’t eat out of stress. We eat to fuel our bodies appropriately for the right reasons. We are also saving money as a NSV, as we were eating out 3-4 days PER WEEK, and now we are cooking more than ever at home- and I. ATE. SALAD! I used to hate the idea of anything green, and last week I bought and ATE salad on my own. Nick is no longer drinking Energy Drinks (he used to drink 1-2/day for the last 10 years) and hasn’t had A SINGLE DRINK since starting the FWTFL, and doesn’t NEED the energy. I am no longer drinking soda, which I can easily say was an addiction, as I needed the caffeine in order to stay awake because my body was SO out of whack.
• “If It Fits Your Macros” – this is the polar opposite of the eat clean maxim. Eat whatever you like as long as it “fits your macros”. While the intent behind this message was to prevent the neurotic mentality of ‘eat clean’, as is bound to happen, people bastardised the term and began eating all sorts of junk and weird food combinations to ‘hit their macros’.
• Fasted training: If you train fasted, supplementing with BCAA’s can offset any potential muscle loss. Anecdotally, people tend to perform better when they consume BCAA’s during their workout, especially if training early in the day. But is it absolutely necessary? No. If you do train fasted, aim to consume some protein (20-30g) post workout and you’ll be fine.
When you eat carby, sugary foods and snacks, you end up with the all-too-familiar sugar spikes and energy crashes. That’s all due to insulin, which skyrockets when you eat carbs. Insulin also tells the body to store calories as fat — and most people trying to lose weight aren’t looking for extra padding in the belly or thighs. Since dietary fat has less impact on insulin levels than carbohydrates or even protein does, you don’t have to worry about sugar crashes, cravings or storing rolls of body fat.
Is a calorie truly a calorie? Not always, because different types of calories can affect your body and your results differently. Dietary fat, for example, is more "fattening" than protein or carbs because it's less likely to be used to build your body. Granted, carbs can potentially make you fat, but they also directly fuel your training. Protein? That's a no-brainer: It builds muscle. Fat does neither, but it isn't useless; moderate amounts of it support vitamin absorption and help manufacture hormones.

Most people who want to lose weight have more than 12 pounds to lose. That’s why even the best weight loss drug in the world can only be an optional complement to other treatment. That’s why this piece of advice is number 18 out of 18. It may be a helpful addition for some people, but the advice higher on the list is what can make the biggest difference, by far.
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For this lightning-fast Tabata workout, pick four total-body moves (plank jacks, jump squats, etc.). Do one for 20 seconds, rest for 10 seconds, then do it again. Continue to the next move and repeat. The routine is just four minutes long—and you’ll torch 13½ calories a minute and double your calorie burn for half an hour afterward, per research from Auburn University in Alabama.
The good news is, running may help you fall asleep easier and more deeply. Numerous studies have found that daily aerobic exercise—specifically the moderate to intense type, like cardio, strength training, and yoga—improves our sleep quality, which helps us avoid the consequences of sleep deprivation such as increased risk of cardiovascular disease and metabolism issues. If you run in the evening, make sure to leave enough time before bed to let your body temperature and heart rate lower, so you don’t feel too revved up to fall asleep.

If you want to keep burning fat, you’ve got to get moving. Whether you’re able to hit the gym first thing in the morning (after your snack from tip #1) or just taking the stairs throughout the day at work and going for a lunchtime walk – the important thing is to get moving and find simple ways to squeeze fitness into your busy day. Since your body will need carbs to recover from your workout, save your larger, healthier meal for afterward.

REALITY: Fat doesn’t make you fat—consuming too many calories does. Foods that contain fat are part of a healthy diet, help maintain your lean body mass, and assist with metabolic function. Healthy fats, like omega-3 fatty acids, can be found in extra-virgin olive oil, coconut oil, almonds, avocados, cashews, peanuts, walnuts, flaxseeds, and more. If you want to lose fat, you need to eat fewer calories and/or burn more calories.
At its core, burning fat comes down to the process of lipolysis—the breaking down of fat lipids, explains Seedman. This happens in the mitochondria of the muscles, or the powerhouses of the cells, responsible for generating the energy our cells need to do their jobs. Exercise has been shown to improve mitochondria function, which then promotes fat breakdown, Seedman adds. Plus, working out helps regulate pretty much all the hormones that optimize fat loss.
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