Ultimately, you need to pick a healthy eating plan you can stick to, Stewart says. The benefit of a low-carb approach is that it simply involves learning better food choices—no calorie-counting is necessary. In general, a low-carb way of eating shifts your intake away from problem foods—those high in carbs and sugar and without much fiber, like bread, bagels and sodas—and toward high-fiber or high-protein choices, like vegetables, beans and healthy meats.

I built this protocol for people who simply won’t take my advice to be patient and eat the Bulletproof Diet while using Bulletproof Intermittent Fasting. It uses biohacking techniques I pioneered on myself to reduce – but not eliminate – the risks of rapid fat loss. It prevents the metabolic harm and brain fog that come with very low-calorie diets (or multiple day fasts), and it does everything I can think of to maintain health in the face of additional toxins.  This is also not intended for people who are already fairly lean (10-14% body fat).  It is designed for obese and severely overweight people who want to lose fat as fast as possible.
Nighttime snacking may be even worse than we thought. When researchers fed rats the same number and kind of calories but varied whether they ate them over an eight- to ten-hour period or a 15- to 24-hour span, the late night diners became obese while the rats who noshed only during the day lost weight. While they haven’t identified exactly why this occurred, they believe it has something to do with eating in line with circadian rhythms, or our bodies’ natural internal clocks, which can be triggered by environmental conditions such as sunlight. When researchers repeated the study with humans they got similar results—seems like a good idea to quit eating at sundown.
That said, a Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise study found that runners lost more weight than walkers over a six-year period, possibly because of the afterburn effect. “Running at a high intensity will create an afterburn, which is when your body continues to burn calories when you’re no longer moving,” Rubin says. She suggests starting with three 30-minute runs a week, sprinting for 30 seconds then recovering for 30 seconds to a minute.
Women who ate low-fat dairy products, such as non-fat yogurt and low-fat cheese three to four times a day lost 70 percent more fat than low-dairy dieters, according to a study published in the journal Obesity Research. "Calcium serves as a switch that tells your body to burn excess fat faster," explains study author Michael Zemel, M.D., director of the Nutrition Institute at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Sorry, but you won't reap the same benefits from calcium-fortified O.J. Research shows that you get the best results from dairy products themselves, not fortified foods. Aim for 1,200 mg, which includes about three servings of dairy a day.
“Speed is key—move, walk, or run a little faster and you’ll burn more total calories,” says Kravitz. In fact, changing up your walking pace quickly and frequently can help you melt up to 20% more calories, compared with maintaining a constant speed, according to a 2015 study from The Ohio State University. Try speeding up for 30 seconds, then walking at a comfy pace for three minutes.
Eat more fat: The idea that eating fat makes you fat has been dethroned hard in recent years. And in fact, dietary fat can help you burn more off your body—as long as you’re eating the right kinds. Healthy polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fats—like salmon, trout, avocado, sunflower oils, olive oil, and nuts—can decrease appetite, improve heart health, and stabilize glucose levels which can help trim body fat, Montenegro explains.
Do more HIIT: High intensity interval training (HIIT) is as close to a magic pill as we have (except it involves a whole lot more work than just swallowing a capsule—sorry). Not only does it surge your body to max intensity during the workout, but because you’re working so hard, your body can’t deliver enough oxygen in the moment, explains personal trainer Jeremey DuVall. Your muscles accumulate a “debt” of oxygen that then has to be repaid post-workout. This throws your body into a phase of fat burning for hours after you’re done sweating, known as post-exercise oxygen consumption, or EPOC. Plus, super intense circuits like this activate muscle-building hormones like growth hormone and IGF-1, he adds.
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