Obviously, it’s still possible to lose weight on any diet – just eat fewer calories than you burn, right? The problem with this simplistic advice is that it ignores the elephant in the room: Hunger. Most people don’t like to “just eat less”, i.e. being hungry forever. That’s dieting for masochists. Sooner or later, a normal person will give up and eat, hence the prevalence of “yo-yo dieting”.

I have recently gone through a couple of years of health struggles. Ranging from two broken feet at once to ovary/uterus issues that landed me in the hospital several times and ultimately resulted in a major surgery. Those times lead to some difficulties and struggles since I was ordered to be in a bed for long periods of time. I found myself struggling with depression. Something I had never experienced before and if I'm honest, was completely devastating. It was hard to see the light at the end of the tunnel after struggling for so long. Those were some dark times. I tried many things to pull myself out of fog I was in without little to no success.
I joined the August FWTFL group knowing that I was ready, both mentally and emotionally, to make some big changes. Two small kids, a full-time business, and just life in general have been so busy for the past several years that I have not consistently made the time to prioritize my own fitness and health. I knew I needed structure and accountability, but also the freedom to LIVE life and enjoy the things that are important to me (such as a glass of wine on occasion, dinners out at restaurants with the family, and fun social events) without constantly feeling deprived. I’ve tried those other exercise and food plans and just could never make them “stick” long-term because they did not fit my life.  
Other diabetes medications. Insulin-releasing tablets (e.g. sulphonylureas) often lead to weight gain. These include: Minodiab, Euglucon, Daonil, and Glibenclamide. Tablets like Avandia, Actos, Starlix and NovoNorm also encourage weight gain. But not Metformin. The newer drugs Victoza and Byetta (injectable) often lead to weight loss, but possible long-term side effects are still unknown. More on diabetes
At its core, burning fat comes down to the process of lipolysis—the breaking down of fat lipids, explains Seedman. This happens in the mitochondria of the muscles, or the powerhouses of the cells, responsible for generating the energy our cells need to do their jobs. Exercise has been shown to improve mitochondria function, which then promotes fat breakdown, Seedman adds. Plus, working out helps regulate pretty much all the hormones that optimize fat loss.
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