Another misconception about HIIT is that it will cause muscle loss. This is just not true either. This myth got started because a higher amount of calories burned during HIIT will come from stored amino acids (muscle tissue) when compared to lower intensity cardio. As long as HIIT sessions are kept to a short duration muscle loss not be a problem. In fact, muscle growth and muscle retention are increased due to the effects HIIT has on anabolic hormones. Just one 10-15 minute session of HIIT can increase testosterone and growth hormone levels for hours after the workout has ended.
If you want to keep burning fat, you’ve got to get moving. Whether you’re able to hit the gym first thing in the morning (after your snack from tip #1) or just taking the stairs throughout the day at work and going for a lunchtime walk – the important thing is to get moving and find simple ways to squeeze fitness into your busy day. Since your body will need carbs to recover from your workout, save your larger, healthier meal for afterward.
Low-calorie diets: It is harmful to reduce your daily calorie intake lower than 1400 calories per day, because your body adjusts to a semi-starvation state and looks for alternative sources of energy. In addition to burning fat, your body will eventually burn muscle tissue. Because your heart is a muscle, prolonged starvation will weaken it and interfere with its normal rhythms. Low-calorie diets don't meet the body's nutrition needs, and without nutrients your body cannot function normally.
Eating breakfast jump-starts your metabolism so it's no accident that those who skip this meal are 41⁄2 times as likely to be obese. The heartier your first meal is, the better. In one study published by the American Journal of Epidemiology, volunteers who got 22 to 55 percent of their total calories at breakfast gained only 1.7 pounds on average over 4 years. While those who got zero to 11 percent gained nearly 3 pounds.
This may explain why the fat-burning effects of eating more protein were confirmed in a study published in the American Journal of Physiology. One group was fed a high-protein diet (just over 1 gram per pound of body weight per day) while the second group consumed an amount closer to the lower recommendation of the RDA (recommended dietary allowance). The group eating the higher-protein diet burned the most fat.
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