Studies show that eating protein for breakfast may help increase how satisfied you feel throughout the day and help prevent nighttime noshing. It also helps build muscle, and more muscle means more fat burning. Fat, meanwhile, also helps you burn fat! Portion control is key, but be sure to get about 30 percent of your calories from fat, and eat it consistently throughout the day.
We’ve now arrived at tip number 16. If you’re still having trouble losing weight, despite following the 15 pieces of advice listed above, it might be a good idea to bring out the heavy artillery: optimal ketosis. Many people stalling at weight plateaus while on a low-carb diet have found optimal ketosis helpful. It’s what can melt the fat off once again.
While it likely took more than a week to gain unwanted fat, most people wish they could lose it quicker than it came on. “When it comes to losing weight, simply cutting back on your portion sizes could be the most underrated way to drop pounds. However, if you’re already eating less (and exercising more) and are still stuck, there are little tricks of the trade that can help jumpstart your efforts,” Ansel says.
“People used to come into the doctor’s office and say, ‘My metabolism is broken!’” says James Hill, PhD, at the University of Colorado. “We never had any evidence that it actually was, until recently. We were wrong – it was!” While exercise may not be as important for weigh loss as calorie restriction, as Hill says, it’s important in another way: It begins to repair a broken metabolism.
Studies found that people who keep food diaries wind up eating about 15 percent less food than those who don’t. Watch out for weekends: A University of North Carolina study found people tend to consume an extra 115 calories per weekend day, primarily from alcohol and fat. (Though good news: You can work out only on weekends and still lose weight.) Then cut out or down calories from spreads, dressings, sauces, condiments, drinks, and snacks; they could make the difference between weight gain and loss. Don’t miss these other tricks for stopping weekend weight gain.
Although sitting down to eat is the most common way to enjoy your food, research shows that people who stand while eating consume 30 percent more during their next meal than those who take a seat. How so? Scientists think that if we stand while eating, we don’t consider it a real meal and therefore resort to eating more later in the day. So if you ate a 450 calorie breakfast on your feet, you could potentially reduce that morning meal to just 360 by taking a seat. That translates to 9 pounds lost over the course of a year.
With a slow metabolism, it is difficult and stress can actually make you gain weight. Cut out foods that have high sodium. Sodium will retain the water you drink causing you to gain weight. If you have had something with high sodium, have a banana as its potassium content will help to remove the sodium. Cardio exercise is the best at getting the heart rate up and kicking the fat. Exercise when you get up in the morning, even if you're doing jumping jacks for a minute or running in place. The heart rate is up and burning calories, which helps boost metabolism. Sprinkle cayenne pepper on your food to boost metabolism as well. Cinnamon also helps metabolize sugar. Calorie count of only 1200 calorie count a day.
Don’t let extra hours lounging in bed stand between you and a flatter belly. While getting enough sleep can help boost your metabolic rate, sleeping in may undo any benefit you’d enjoy from catching a few extra winks. One study reveals that late sleepers who snoozed past 10:45 in the morning ate nearly 250 more calories over the course of the day, despite eating half as many fruits and vegetables as their early bird counterparts. Even worse, they chowed down on more salty, sugary, and trans fat-laden fast food than those who woke up earlier. If you happen to head out of the house early, you’re in for an additional metabolic boost; researchers at Northwestern University have found that people exposed to just a short period of early morning sunlight had lower BMIs than their late-waking counterparts.
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