1. Work out first thing in the morning. What do 90% of people who exercise consistently have in common? They exercise in the morning. Working out in the morning more or less guarantees that you’ll work out every day, and the benefits carry over throughout your day. For one, exercise in the morning increases your energy levels, which makes you more productive throughout the day and more focused on your work. Also, getting in an early morning workout helps you burn more calories throughout the day. Working out helps to increase your metabolic rate, burning calories for long after you’ve stopped exercising.
It's all in the timing—when you eat and how slowly you kick the habit. "You're hardwired to crave sugary foods because they have readily available calories," says Yoni Freedhoff, M.D., author of The Diet Fix. "When you're really hungry, you crave highly caloric food. It's a physiological response as well as a psychological one." So avoid a cupcake binge by eating to minimize hunger: Plan three well-balanced meals and two snacks a day that include plenty of protein, which has a higher satiating power than fat or carbs. Now make another plan to gradually cut the sweet stuff. If you abruptly slash your sugar intake by half, your palate will freak out, says Dr. Freedhoff. Set a goal to cut your consumption by 10 percent a week; in five weeks, you'll hit that 50 percent milestone. First, target those liquid sugars: You can swap in a diet soda for regular at first, but try to eventually switch to just water or tea. Next, look at the added sugars in your diet and start replacing them with lower-sugar alternatives. Craving an afternoon candy bar? Try a protein bar instead. If you're salivating over ice cream, try Greek yogurt with fresh fruit or a frozen banana. "A lot of times, it's less about the food itself than it is the habit of eating and the reward that comes along with it," says Men's Health nutrition advisor Mike Roussell, PhD. "You can keep the habit but cut out the sugar."
If you eat your dinner restaurant style on your plate rather than family style, helping yourself from bowls and platters on the table, you’ll lose weight. Most of us tend to eat an average of 150 percent more calories in the evening than in the morning. You’ll avoid that now because when your plate is empty, you’re finished; there’s no reaching for seconds.
You don’t have to go low-carb to ditch those extra pounds around your waist in a short period of time. In fact, opting for more whole grains might just get you there faster. Researchers at Tufts University have linked eating three or more daily servings of whole grains to as much as a 10 percent reduction in visceral body fat, the kind that ups your risk for chronic diseases, like diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. <<
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