The final possible culprit behind stubborn weight issues may be the stress hormone, cortisol. Too much cortisol will increase hunger levels, bringing along subsequent weight gain. The most common cause of elevated cortisol is chronic stress and lack of sleep (see tip #10), or cortisone medication (tip #9). It’s a good idea to try your best to do something about this.
Don't just take our word for it. Our favorite experts say that depending on your body type, it's realistic to drop 5 pounds in five days -- or at least lose enough water weight, or trim enough inches, to make it look like you have, which is all that really matters. Best of all, none of the following ways to look skinnier involve crash dieting, funky pills, or hunger pangs that'll make you run for the nearest vending machine at 4 p.m.
Men and women squirrel away fat differently, according to Harris-Pincus. On average, women have six to 11 percent more body fat than men. That extra fat typically gathers lower on the body (especially before they hit menopause) around the hips and thighs, creating a pear-shape. Men, on the other hand, tend to accumulate fat around the belly (hence, the beer gut).
While many people turn to artificial sweeteners in a misguided attempt to whittle their waistlines, those fake sugars are likely to have the opposite effect. According to researchers at Yale, artificial sweeteners are actually linked with an increased risk of abdominal obesity and weight gain, possibly because they can trigger cravings for the real stuff and spike insulin levels in a similar fashion to real sugar.
Eat regular but smaller meals a day - at least 5 times a day. This will prevent you from overeating and also it will also boost your metabolism. Stick to eggs, chicken and lean meats and off course your veggies and fresh fruit and you're on the right way. Also remember to drink a lot of water because your body need it to function properly. Avoid any fluids with high sugar content - for obvious reasons. Cardio exercise is a great way to burn body fat and calories. Here you can focus brsick walking, running, jogging, or any other for of cardio exercise. Cardio cycling is good, too. Next is to get your muscles working in order for you to tighten up those muscles. Try chest presses, lateral pull-downs, dumbbell rows, free weight squats and so on. Remember, it is a myth that endless crunches will flatten your stomach. You have to focus on healthy eating, cardio and some weight training . For more information, see the page link, further down this page, listed under Related Questions.
We don’t always eat simply to satisfy hunger. All too often, we turn to food when we’re stressed or anxious, which can wreck any diet and pack on the pounds. Do you eat when you’re worried, bored, or lonely? Do you snack in front of the TV at the end of a stressful day? Recognizing your emotional eating triggers can make all the difference in your weight-loss efforts. If you eat when you’re:

A University of Vermont study found that online weight-loss buddies help you keep the weight off. The researchers followed volunteers for 18 months. Those assigned to an Internet-based weight maintenance program sustained their weight loss better than those who met face-to-face in a support group. You and your weight loss buddy can share tips like these ways to lose weight without exercise.


“Anytime you’re stressed, you probably go for food,” Dr. Seltzer says. (Have we met?!) That’s because cortisol, the stress hormone, stokes your appetite for sugary, fatty foods. No wonder it’s associated with higher body weight, according to a 2007 Obesity study that quantified chronic stress exposure by looking at cortisol concentrations in more than 2,000 adults’ hair.
Do you even lift, bro? If you’re serious about getting rid of that belly fat fast, resistance training might just be the key. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health found that adding weight training to adult male test subjects’ workouts significantly reduced their risk of abdominal obesity over a multi-year study period, although doing the same amount of cardio had no such effect. Research from the University of Maryland even found that just 16 weeks of weight training boosted study participants’ metabolic rates by a whopping 7.7 percent, making it easier to ditch those extra inches around your middle.
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