Perhaps none—and it may even help you drop pounds. Weight loss is a marathon, not a sprint, and of course you'll indulge. But you've just used up your daily calorie allowance. "Your junk-food allotment shouldn't take up more than 10 to 20 percent of your total daily calories," says MH nutrition advisor Alan Aragon, M.S Let's do the math: On a 2,000-calorie diet, that's 200 to 400 calories on a splurge item. A medium order of fries can run about 400 calories, and keep in mind that it's also a starch infused with unhealthy fats. But if you deprive yourself of foods you love, you might be more likely to binge later on, says Aragon.
Attempting to reduce fat in just one part of your body at a timeis likely to be disappointing. . Fat reduction works like this: When you try to lose fat, thereduction occurs all throughout your body. Unlike muscle-building,it cannot be specifically targeted to one region. Also, thereduction in fat will not be quickly apparent because it will notbe focused on only one spot on your body. So it's helpful to have a"slowly but surely" attitude. . Note that exercises mostly serve to tone the muscle underneaththe fat. But if you want to slim down, the fat has to be burnedoff. For that, the main thing is to ditch the junk food and thesweetened drinks. Exercise alone might not be sufficient. Here's a program for the period in which you want to loseweight: . Plenty of moderate aerobic exercise, no sweetened liquids atall, and no junk food at all. Preferably no sugar, and as littleadded salt and processed foods as possible. Eat 3 not-largemeals/day; do not skip breakfast; and avoid snacks. Limit yourcalories (better to consult a doctor or nutritionist concerning theamount), and weigh yourself 2-3 times/week. Ignore the sensation ofhunger. If you see your weight diminishing at a safe, reasonablerate (1-2 pounds/week), keep it up. Once you've reached your target weight, increase your calorieintake somewhat. And you can then have small amounts of sweetenedfoods or junk food on occasion (if at all), along with your regularfoods (not instead of them). But keep checking your weight 2-3times/week. Avoid crash diets, diet pills etc. Avoid fatty cuts of meat. Walkas much as possible. Bicycling and swimming are good too. More guidelines: Don't concentrate on specific foods so much as on a balanced,healthy diet plus exercise. Plenty of moderate exercise rather thanintense exercise, which can damage your joints. Good nutrition means eating what your body needs, while ingestingas few harmful things as possible. It has also been described asgetting enough of each of the major food categories (grains,fruits, vegetables, protein, dairy, etc.; plus plenty of water). This will vary somewhat from one person to another; and I don'tbelieve that there's any universal diet that can be prescribed foreveryone. Avoid best-sellers with their perennial fad diets. Andthink twice before using any dietary supplements or weight-losspills. In general, one's starting point can be a menu of whole grains,whole-wheat bread, a good amount of vegetables, some fruits andnuts, fish, lean meats (in not-large amounts), and some dairy.However, this must be tweaked according to one's health, weight andother factors at the outset; and also adjusted over time, as onesees what works for him/her in particular.
Will your body tell you when its exhausted of your caloric deficit? I have lost fat at the rate I am happy with, but recently I started to feel faint, dizzy, and experienced headaches while working out. Each set I completed I am winded, and feel that I will faint at any second. I still want to lose fat but I feel that if I maintain a 20% caloric deficit I will surely start fainting.
The other problem with exercise-without-dieting is that it’s simply tiring, and again, the body will compensate. “If the exercise made you tired so that you become more sedentary the rest of the day, you might not experience any net negative energy,” says Klein. Some of the calories we burn come from our basic movements throughout the day – so if you’re wiped out after exercise, and more likely to sit on the couch afterwards, you’ve lost the energy deficit you gained from your jog.
And what fat loss comes down to is simply a caloric deficit. Which means either burning more calories, eating less calories, or a combination of the two. And when you get down to it, it’s just a whole lot easier for most people to eat (for example) 500 less calories per day than it will be for them to try to burn those same 500 calories every single day. That’s why diet alone gets the job done just fine, and diet and exercise combined gets the job done too. But exercise alone? That’s the least effective of the group by far.
Whether or not you’re specifically aiming to cut carbs, most of us consume unhealthy amounts of sugar and refined carbohydrates such as white bread, pizza dough, pasta, pastries, white flour, white rice, and sweetened breakfast cereals. Replacing refined carbs with their whole-grain counterparts and eliminating candy and desserts is only part of the solution, though. Sugar is hidden in foods as diverse as canned soups and vegetables, pasta sauce, margarine, and many reduced fat foods. Since your body gets all it needs from sugar naturally occurring in food, all this added sugar amounts to nothing but a lot of empty calories and unhealthy spikes in your blood glucose.
Look, there’s just no simple way to get your body to weigh less than it naturally wants to, which is what you’re attempting when you go for a chiseled look, without some sacrifice — and by sacrifice, I mean the usual suspects like added sugars, fried foods, alcohol, soda, etc. Notice I just cited the importance of every macronutrient food group. Junk foods have no importance, except (arguably) for pleasure. There’s a reason why you’ll find treats in 21 Day Fix, but they vanish in Fix Extreme. If the tips above aren’t working, something’s got to go.
There is some scientific legitimacy to today’s lower-carb diets: Large amounts of simple carbohydrates from white flour and added sugar can wreak havoc on your blood sugar and lead to weight gain. While avoiding sugar, white rice, and white flour, however, you should eat plenty of whole-grain breads and brown rice. One Harvard study of 74,000 women found that those who ate more than two daily servings of whole grains were 49 percent less likely to be overweight than those who ate the white stuff. Eating whole grains is not only one of many great ways to lose weight; it can also make you smarter.
The degree to which exercise aids weight loss is open to debate, but the benefits go way beyond burning calories. Exercise can increase your metabolism and improve your outlook—and it’s something you can benefit from right now. Go for a walk, stretch, move around and you’ll have more energy and motivation to tackle the other steps in your weight-loss program.

Eat regular but smaller meals a day - at least 5 times a day. This will prevent you from overeating and also it will also boost your metabolism. Stick to eggs, chicken and lean meats and off course your veggies and fresh fruit and you're on the right way. Also remember to drink a lot of water because your body need it to function properly. Avoid any fluids with high sugar content - for obvious reasons. Cardio exercise is a great way to burn body fat and calories. Here you can focus brsick walking, running, jogging, or any other for of cardio exercise. Cardio cycling is good, too. Next is to get your muscles working in order for you to tighten up those muscles. Try chest presses, lateral pull-downs, dumbbell rows, free weight squats and so on. Remember, it is a myth that endless crunches will flatten your stomach. You have to focus on healthy eating, cardio and some weight training . For more information, see the page link, further down this page, listed under Related Questions.
Water is great for health, but it’s even better when you are trying to lose weight and flatten your stomach. This is because when you drink enough water, you are actually helping your system to maintain proper water balance which helps in reducing water retention, a major cause of bloated bellies. Water also makes us feel full and reduces overeating.
Chronic sleep deprivation can wreak havoc on your weight-loss efforts. “Your hunger hormones reset when you sleep, too, so if you’re deprived of quality and quantity sleep, you’re behind the eight ball when you first wake up, and more likely to crave junk food and carbs,” Jackson says. Sleep is also when your muscles repair post-workout, so it’s even more important to get enough once you’ve started your workout routine. “Quantity is good, but quality is also important,” Jackson says. “Sleep hormones are naturally released around 8 or 9pm, so by going to bed at 10 or so, you’ll feel more replenished because you’ll have slept during the window for best quality.”
It's not uncommon to have belly fat that you want to lose. Whether the fat around your midsection is visceral fat or subcutaneous fat, your plan will be the same. To lose fat, you need to increase your daily activity and reduce your food intake. You might see pills and supplements advertised online that claim to reduce belly fat, but most of those products don't work—and some can even be dangerous.
“If you’re feeling deprived by your diet, build in a cheat meal at least once a week in which you can indulge guilt-free. Doing this will help you avoid viewing certain foods as ‘off limits,’ which will help you crave them less.” — David Zinczenko, author of  Zero Belly Cookbook: 150+ Delicious Recipes to Flatten Your Belly, Turn Off Your Fat Genes, and Help Keep You Lean for Life!
It’s true that types of foods you eat may, over time, affect your metabolic profile, so they may also matter in this way, but when it boils down, sticking to any reduced-calorie diet will create the energy deficit needed to lose weight. So the point is not to question what a calorie is, but rather to understand that we need to “trade up” our foods, says Katz – exchange the very dense, calorie-packed foods for foods that are less calorie-dense and more nutritionally dense: these are the ones that are bulkier, less energetically rich, have more or higher quality protein, are lower on the glycemic index, and more fibrous.
Exercise alone, especially doing hundreds of crunches or hours of treadmill miles, isn't the key to reducing belly fat. Although we can't spot-reduce fat from our bellies, all it takes is the right combo of lifestyle changes, including diet and exercise, and you'll have a leaner torso — and you can keep it that way! Incorporate these nine simple, doable, expert-recommended habits to ditch belly fat for good. Start by incorporating these habits one at at time, and losing belly fat will feel easy.
You don’t have to go low-carb to ditch those extra pounds around your waist in a short period of time. In fact, opting for more whole grains might just get you there faster. Researchers at Tufts University have linked eating three or more daily servings of whole grains to as much as a 10 percent reduction in visceral body fat, the kind that ups your risk for chronic diseases, like diabetes, heart disease, and high blood pressure. <<
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